PennyStockPayCheck.com Rss

Featured Posts

Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

Read more

Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

Read more

Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

Read more

Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

Read more

UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

Read more

Advantages of Wooden Furniture Behind Its Revival According to Casa Bella

Category : Stocks

HAWKERIDGE, UNITED KINGDOM–(Marketwire – Feb. 21, 2013) - The practice of decorating homes with wooden furniture is as old as Ancient Greece, but it is undergoing a modern renaissance as more and more people appreciate its benefits.

See the article here: Advantages of Wooden Furniture Behind Its Revival According to Casa Bella

Post to Twitter

New five-euro note has goddess

Category : World News

The ancient Greek goddess Europa features on a new five-euro note unveiled by the European Central Bank.

Go here to see the original: New five-euro note has goddess

Post to Twitter

Corporation of London: treasure trove | Editorial

Category : Business

No one serious about democracy can be relaxed about a borough in which big business controls most of the votes

If the traditional deference of British society is embodied in the crown, the tradition of the British economy – of proud finance and malcontent industry – is embodied in the Corporation of London. Older than parliament, it is the nearest thing the Square Mile has to a local council – which is not that near at all.

The livery companies, freemen and the aldermen mark it out, not to mention a lord mayoralty that has existed since 1189, the year time immemorial technically stopped. That office naturally operates in splendid isolation from City Hall. Then there is ancient treasure stashed away in three venerable vaults: the charitable fund, whose tasks include upkeep of London Bridge; the City fund; and finally the so-called City’s Cash, to which the greatest mystery is attached. Last week, a little of that mystery disappeared, when the corporation published accounts which, for the first time, revealed the sum total of assets – to which the likes of the real-life Dick Whittington have contributed – as £1.3bn.

One king, Charles I, lost his head after attempting reform of the City. After a brief pause for a civil war and a commonwealth, his son, Charles II, tried again. That attempt was also seen off, and the glorious revolution duly entrenched London’s autonomy. The corporation insists that it has not proactively hidden its holdings, but – with this kind of record of resisting change – you have to ask why it opened its long-closed books at this particular moment? The most persuasive answer is the Occupy protesters, who last year made transparency a top demand. It would not have been in the style of the City to publish the numbers while the unhappy campers were still outside, but – just as Kennedy dismantled missiles in Turkey once a respectable interval had passed after Khrushchev’s retreat over Cuba – once the crisis had passed, the corporation demonstrated some flexibility. Flexibility that has no doubt helped it to survive so long.

It will be galling for cash-strapped town halls to learn the full measure of the Guildhall’s treasure trove in times like these, but is the corporation’s ancient blend of guild and gold truly a concern for the country? Might it be one of those anachronisms that no one would invent, but which nonetheless work?

Although the corporation acquits important tasks like maintaining Hampstead Heath competently enough, no one serious about the principle of democracy can be so relaxed about a borough in which big businesses, and not the people, control most of the votes. There are practical concerns, too. From last year’s row over the treatment of the porters of Billingsgate fish market, to last week’s press release resisting the idea of splitting up the banks, come stances which one might expect from an oligarchic electorate.

AUDIO: Roman outsourcing: ‘A back-scratching deal’

Category : World News

News that Virgin had lost the franchise to run the West Coast main line broke this week. But the issue of how much a private company should bid to run a public service was something the ancient Romans had to grapple with as well as Mary Beard, Professor of Classics at Cambridge University explains.

Read the original: AUDIO: Roman outsourcing: ‘A back-scratching deal’

Post to Twitter

Chinese medicine and its ancient practices

Category : World News

Chinese medicine and its ancient practices

See the original post: Chinese medicine and its ancient practices

Post to Twitter

Ancient Greek solution for debt crisis

Category : Business

How the Ancient Greeks would solve the financial crisis

More: Ancient Greek solution for debt crisis

Post to Twitter

Ancient graves found near Paulatuk, N.W.T.

Category : World News

Some ancient graves, dating between 400 and 1,000 years old, have been discovered at Tuktut Nogait National Park near Paulatuk, N.W.T.

More: Ancient graves found near Paulatuk, N.W.T.

Post to Twitter

Singer finds fusion in Japan’s cultural dichotomy

Category : World News

Japan’s fusion of the traditional and modern fascinated musician Yara Eddine as a young child when she learned about the country at a school in Canada. Fifteen years later, Eddine witnessed this integration firsthand.
Arriving at Narita International Airport alongside the contemporary craziness of soccer fans during the 2002 Japan/South Korea World Cup, Eddine observed a modern, efficient society hosting an international spectacle. Yet as she walked out of a train station in Sapporo and saw the Yosakoi-Soran Festival with taiko drumming, swirling kimono and men in fundoshi loincloths, Eddine felt connected to ancient Japan: “I don’t know what it is about Japan, but this country always had a piece of my heart.”

Read the original: Singer finds fusion in Japan’s cultural dichotomy

Post to Twitter

Sakura: Soul of Japan

Category : World News

“If I were asked to explain the Japanese spirit, I would say it is wild cherry blossoms glowing in the morning sun!” — Motoori Norinaga (1730-1801), nativist thinker and poet
The cherry blossom is not just another pretty flower. Pause to consider, as you feast, drink and carol beneath the blushing petals this season, how ancient a rite of spring your frolics are perpetuating.

Continued here: Sakura: Soul of Japan

Post to Twitter

Sakura: Soul of Japan

Category : World News

“If I were asked to explain the Japanese spirit, I would say it is wild cherry blossoms glowing in the morning sun!” — Motoori Norinaga (1730-1801), nativist thinker and poet
The cherry blossom is not just another pretty flower. Pause to consider, as you feast, drink and carol beneath the blushing petals this season, how ancient a rite of spring your frolics are perpetuating.

Read more from the original source: Sakura: Soul of Japan

Post to Twitter