PennyStockPayCheck.com Rss

Featured Posts

Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

Read more

Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

Read more

Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

Read more

Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

Read more

UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

Read more

Hefazat-e Islam: Islamist coalition – BBC News

Category : Stocks


BBC News
Hefazat-e Islam: Islamist coalition
BBC News
The Hefazat-e Islam is a tightly-knit coalition of a dozen or so Islamist organisations which have come together under one umbrella only in recent years. It has traditionally not sought power through elections, but looks to use its street muscle to change
Bangladesh protests: at least 15 killed as police clash with demonstratorsThe Guardian
Bangladeshi capital wears an eerie calm a day after Islamists battle policeCNN
15 Dead in Bangladesh Anti-Blasphemy Protests – VOAVoice of America
euronews

Post to Twitter

VIDEO: Hobbies turned into businesses

Category : World News

BBC News went to a craft event to meet three people who have turned their hobbies into profitable businesses.

See the article here: VIDEO: Hobbies turned into businesses

Post to Twitter

Damascus military facilities ‘hit by Israel rockets’ – BBC News

Category : Stocks


BBC News
Damascus military facilities 'hit by Israel rockets'
BBC News
Witnesses heard huge explosions near the Jamraya facility, which Western officials have suggested is involved in chemical weapons research. Residents told the BBC that nearby military positions were also hit. Israel has not confirmed the strike, but sources
Israeli warplanes renew strikes on Syria; official says target is Hezbollah-bound Washington Post
Israel carries out second air strike in SyriaThe Guardian
Israel Strikes Syria, Targeting Missiles for Hezbollah – VOAVoice of America
CNN

Post to Twitter

Downton Abbey, Broadchurch and beyond: how ITV got back on top

Category : Business

TV thriller Broadchurch was an extraordinary hit. Perhaps most surprising was the fact that it was on ITV, not always seen as the home of edgy entertainment. But that’s changing

There was something out of the ordinary about Broadchurch, the TV murder mystery that kept nearly 10 million viewers guessing until the killer of 11-year-old Danny Latimer was revealed this week. The work almost entirely of a single writer – unusual for an eight-part drama – it featured only one murder (the average episode of Midsomer Murders has four).

Most surprising of all, perhaps, was

Post to Twitter

AUDIO: Peston: Will Co-op exit banking?

Category : Business

Speaking on the Today programme the BBC’s business editor Robert Peston said that “there is a very big chance that the Co-op would pull out of banking all together.”

Read more from the original source: AUDIO: Peston: Will Co-op exit banking?

Post to Twitter

Few planning to migrate to UK – poll

Category : Business

The coming end of EU work restrictions for people from Romania and Bulgaria is having little impact on their plans to move, BBC surveys suggest.

Original post: Few planning to migrate to UK – poll

Post to Twitter

Google boss defends UK tax record

Category : Business, World News

Speaking to the BBC, Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, defends his company for paying just £6m in UK corporation tax in 2011.

See the original post here: Google boss defends UK tax record

Post to Twitter

VIDEO: Hugh’s review: Making sense of the stats

Category : Business, World News

The BBC’s Hugh Pym is joined by guests to discuss what this week’s inflation, retail and unemployment figures mean for the UK economy.

See the original post here: VIDEO: Hugh’s review: Making sense of the stats

Post to Twitter

VIDEO: Meet the ebook evangelists

Category : World News

BBC News catches up with some of the people exhibiting in the digital zone of the London Book Fair, to hear their views on the state of internet publishing.

Read the rest here: VIDEO: Meet the ebook evangelists

Post to Twitter

Stephanie McGovern: Why quotas are dangerous and undermine women’s credibility

Category : Business

The BBC’s business correspondent recalls being told: ‘I didn’t realise people like you were clever’ and explains why blagging it is a good idea

I am a young woman, with a regional accent, from a working class family, who has had a pretty standard education. So far, so ordinary. But in the places I’ve worked, one or more of these things would put me in the minority.

When I was 18 I joined Black & Decker as part of a pre-university ‘year in industry’ scheme. At that time it was a business full of men who had been there for years. When I turned up with my youthful enthusiasm and stilettos I was a novelty. Some tried to chat me up; most ignored me. I’d gone from being top dog in school to underdog in the workplace, so I made it my mission to show them that I was useful.

That, along with some cheeky banter, eventually won them over. The team accepted me as one of their own and the success of my work there lead to me winning the ‘Young Engineer for Britain’ award. After that I got interviewed a lot by the media. I was a journalist’s dream case study; a gobby girl with an accent who was good at engineering.

Through my media appearances, I managed to wangle a part-time job in the BBC current affairs department, which I did whilst studying for my science degree. Being a woman wasn’t a novelty to my BBC bosses — lots of women work in the media – this time I stood out because I had a northern accent.

I remember once at the end of a BBC job interview the manager said to me: “I didn’t realise people like you were clever.” I don’t think he was being intentionally nasty. At that time in the BBC he was surrounded by clones of himself, give or take some facial hair and glasses. He had never worked with anyone ‘like me’ before and so thought he was taking a risk by employing me. Later I found out that he’d also told the rest of my team that ‘someone very different was joining who would stir things up a bit’. Fundamentally though, I’m not any different, I just talk differently.

The problem in business isn’t that women are overlooked because they are women, it’s that most people subconsciously look to employ a mini-me. It’s not a gender issue, it’s about diversification full stop. It’s hard to change that mindset and it hits women particularly hard because men historically have always been the recruiters.

Recently I was involved in a debate at Macquarie Bank looking at how businesses can make their employee pool more diverse. One of the panellists was Noreen Doyle, a senior executive with over 40 years experience as a business leader. She suggested that for women to do well they need to take on a more male mindset and ‘blag it’. She added: “There’s a 80:20 rule. A job opens and women who feels she meets 80% of the criteria, applies. A man will say, ‘I have 20% of the criteria – I’ll learn the rest on the job.’ “

When I joined BBC Breakfast I was surprised by the number of viewers who felt that the BBC was doing something radical by putting me on national news to talk about business. I wasn’t what they deemed a typical BBC reporter. There was a misconception that I was there to fill some type of BBC northern quota. Yet I had been working for the national news for 10 years and been involved in making lots of our most high profile programmes. If I were a stick of rock I’d have ‘BBC’ written right through me.

This is why quotas for women in business can be dangerous, because they can undermine the credibility of the women who get top jobs. It’s a view that I’ve found is shared with other women at the top of their game. Eithne Wallis told me that in her role as the founding director general of the National Probation Service, she didn’t support quotas but said that without diversity targets the status quo would prevail: “The achievement of diversity in the workplace is critical to its effectiveness as well as being an ethical issue.” But, she added: “Positive discrimination was absolutely not allowed. It was instead, about creating the culture, end to end systems, and level playing fields to ensure that appropriate access and advancement was made available to all.”

There is an assumption that if you’re in the minority in the workplace then you’ll have a harder life than most. Personally I have had a wonderful career so far, but what has been vital is having champions; people in the business who mentor you, but also sing your praises to others. Mine have fought battles for me in work and taught me that if you know what you’re talking about and you work hard then you don’t need to fit a preconceived mould. Your genetic makeup and upbringing is irrelevant, it’s how you use your ability that counts.

Stephanie McGovern is business correspondent for BBC Breakfast

Sign up to become a member of the Women in Leadership community for more comment, analysis and best practice direct to your inbox