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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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VIDEO: McDonald’s boss on dining at work

Category : Business

The chief executive of McDonald’s UK, Jill McDonald, on why the company is opening its burger-making plants to the public, and her own diet.

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Heinz: Buffett buyout gets even less Buffett-y

Category : Business, Stocks

Heinz’s new CEO Bernardo Hees comes from Burger King and, before that, Buffett’s buyout partner 3G. It’s another move that’s outside of Buffett’s playbook.

See more here: Heinz: Buffett buyout gets even less Buffett-y

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A big lump of horse ran into your burger? Don’t wave it around or everyone’ll want one | Charlie Brooker

Category : Business

Cheap food disgusts us, but many of the posh alternatives are just as likely to put you off your dinner

We worry too much about food in this country. That’s probably why we throw so much away. This wasn’t always the case. Take a stroll back in time to the 1920s: look around this jerky black-and-white world. No one cares what they eat, so long as they are eating something. They scratch in the mud all day so they can gnaw their blackened fingernails for sustenance in the evening. Peas are

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Horse burgers should have us all weeping in the aisles | Tanya Gold

Category : Business

The supermarkets are not the victims in this scandal – with false smells and tastes they’ve made us lose touch with what we eat

In Stephen Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd it was initially cats in pies; later, because all drama needs momentum, it was extras in pies. Now, in widening swaths of our glittering supermarkets and cheaper restaurants, it is bits of pig and horse in beefburgers, sometimes in grotesque amounts.

Ignore the chatter about horsemeat being good for you; this is not an opportunity to amaze with pony recipes, but a vast fraud perpetrated, inevitably, against poorer consumers. Was anyone surprised that the adulteration occurred in “value” products? I am surprised that the outcry has not been louder – so far, most of the tears shed have been for the cute ponies, not for the cute children who obliviously swallowed the cute ponies, and then played with their plastic cousins.

What is worse – eating Peppa Pig or your Little Pony? That depends on whether you are a Jilly Cooper fan, a Muslim, or a Jew. Either way, I detect snobbery: if you are a stranger to farmers’ markets, what can you expect for your money, even as it was announced than a million children, or small consumers, will be in poverty under this administration? The story has already crawled into gag. A pantomime horse entered a Tesco in Pembrokeshire earlier this week and pretended to weep in the burger aisle until security removed it.

Food adulteration is as ancient as greed. Bee Wilson’s fascinating book Swindled: the Dark History of Food Fraud, from Poisoned Candy to Counterfeit Coffee tells of 19th-century London grocers selling green vegetables made lustrous with copper, or adding red lead to Double Gloucester cheese. Rotten cheese was refaced, or cladded, with fresher cheese; rotten meat was seared out of the joint, which was then sold on. Bread flour could be cut with sand; pepper with dust from the floor. The Romans sweetened rancid wine with lead. In India sweets may be coloured with poisons; in China, soy sauce was said to be sometimes made from human hair. Tea leaves are recycled and resold; inferior Chinese truffles impersonate Périgold.

I do not accuse Tesco of secret foreknowledge of the yuksome pony burgers. But I do not buy their bewildered sense of victimhood, their quasi-Shakespearian “a fraud perpetrated on us all” rhetoric either. No one is keener to obscure what we are actually eating than the supermarkets, and no one pushes the most dangerous foods more forcefully into our mouths.

A part of the scandal is deregulation. This current adulteration was discovered not in the UK, but in Ireland. As Mary Creagh, the shadow environment secretary, has pointed out in the Guardian, the government split responsibility for food inspections between the Department of Health and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) in 2010: split a responsibility, and watch the chaos flap.

Creagh also noted the Food Standards Agency (FSA) meat hygiene service had its budget cut by £12m over four years. (The budget for trading standards generally will be reduced by about one third, to £140m, by 2014.) The number of trading standards inspections for all products has fallen by 29% in two years and the number of public analyst laboratories has nearly halved in a decade. This is all presumably bliss to industry in general and the food industry in particular who, as I never tire of pointing out, were lucky enough to write the Conservative party’s food policy in opposition.

The government’s response to those pointing out the weaknesses in trading standards was a masterclass in Bush era Americanisms. To criticise the UK food industry is unpatriotic, or, as the environment minister David Heath told Creagh: “It is very important neither you, nor anyone else, talks down the British food industry.” Ignorance, in his mind, is preferable; these days, you are either for burgers, or against them, which is not helpful.

But you cannot regulate for the wider food culture; in this we have a crisis, spurred by our hunger for cheap and varied food, and the terrifying power of monopoly. Of all the things that come too easily and cheaply, perhaps food is the most dangerous? If your beef burgers are less than £6 a kilo, and you do not farm or butcher it yourself (as endorsed by The Original Road Kill Cookbook), can you really be surprised if it is cut with nameless horrors?

Our collective relationship with food is approaching something like psychosis. The 24-hour supermarket, a modern palace of dreams, where everything is available and nothing ever rots, is a fairytale mirage, because it has taught us to forget how to eat. So of course obesity, the sad physical manifestation of forgetting how to eat, is swelling like one of Margaret Atwood’s creepy headless chickens in Oryx and Crake.

False smells and tastes confuse us; edible food that looks wrong is rejected, in a strange parallel with the beauty industry. It was revealed this month that globally we throw away between 30% and 50% of the food we buy from supermarkets, and 75% of the vegetables grown in Britain are never even eaten. If you do not know what it is supposed to taste like, how can you tell what you are eating? The answer came this week. You can’t.

Twitter: @TanyaGold1

Letters: To eat horsemeat or not – a very British dilemma

Category : Business

It is concerning to see your report (Horsemeat discovered in burgers sold by four British supermarkets, 16 January), but this is by no means a new problem. Adulteration of foods, meaning the addition of impure, improper, or inferior ingredients, has been identified in the UK since the 1800s. Bakers would whiten their bread with chalk and sawdust and brewers would add bitter substances to save on the cost of hops. The first Food Adulteration Act was passed in the UK in 1860. However, worrying cases, concerning not only food standards but food safety, have continued to surface. One such case was in 1985, when European wine was found to be adulterated with diethylene glycol, commonly used as a component of “antifreeze”.

Food adulteration has been here since the beginning of time and, despite the measures taken to enforce food standards, will keep food authorities busy for many years to come.
Dr Louise Manning
Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester

• While the thought of unexpectedly tucking into a horse burger shocked the nation, we ask that the public spare a thought for all the other animals slaughtered for their flesh. Britons who say no to horsemeat do so because they find ponies lovable, but lambs, pigs, chickens and others are killed for food without many people batting an eyelid or considering their ordeal. One might question why one species is petted and the others ground up without a thought. If this story has shocked people, Peta suggests that they reject all meat of tortured animals. We stand ready to help.
Ben Williamson
Peta

• Your readers may be amused to hear that all the horsemeat I’ve seen in French supermarkets (not a very significant proportion of the meat

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Can you still go from burger flipper to president?

Category : Business

Can you still go from burger flipper to president?

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A recall of apples sold in 36 states by Ready Pac Foods hits McDonald’s ([[MCD]] -0.4%) and Burger King ([[BKW]] -1.5%). The recall is due to possible listeria contamination.

Category : Stocks, World News

A recall of apples sold in 36 states by Ready Pac Foods hits McDonald’s (MCD -0.4%) and Burger King (BKW -1.5%). The recall is due to possible listeria contamination. 1 comment!

Continued here: A recall of apples sold in 36 states by Ready Pac Foods hits McDonald’s ([[MCD]] -0.4%) and Burger King ([[BKW]] -1.5%). The recall is due to possible listeria contamination.

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Burger King is back with a Whopper-ing debut

Category : Business, Stocks

Will the third trip to the public markets be the charm for Burger King’s investors? Burger King started trading on the New York Stock Exchange Wednesday, and the home of the Whopper quickly popped nearly 7% from its opening price.

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Burger King eyes China expansion

Category : World News

Fast-food giant Burger King says it will open 1,000 restaurants in China over the next five to seven years.

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Salmonella fears prompt Beef Burger Meat Mix recall

Category : World News

Intercity Packers Ltd of Mississauga, Ont. is recalling its Beef Burger Meat Mix because of possible Salmonella contamination.

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