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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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Borrowing grows more than expected

Category : Business

The government had to borrow slightly more than expected in November, the ONS says, but it describes growth in the service sector as “promising”.

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VIDEO: The advancements in point-of-sale tech

Category : World News

John Bruno, Chief Technology Officer at NCR Corporation, describes advancements in POS technology.

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Bradley Wiggins on booze, fatherhood, tax … and Lance Armstrong

Category : Business

In wide-ranging Guardian interview, Tour de France winner says he has withdrawn from tax-avoidance scheme

Bradley Wiggins has pulled out of a controversial tax-avoidance scheme following a barrage of criticism, the first British Tour de France winner has told the Guardian in an exclusive interview in which he also details his considerable disdain for Lance Armstrong and the legacy left by the US rider’s years of organised doping.

Last week, Wiggins was criticised for having joined Twofold First Services, a tax partnership which takes advantage of farming tax reliefs. But in the interview in Weekend magazine, Wiggins says: “I had a small investment in Twofold, following guidance from my professional advisers. I had, however, claimed no tax relief of any amount in regard to this investment. Given the concerns raised about it, I have now instructed my advisors to withdraw me from the scheme with immediate effect.”

Wiggins is odds-on favourite for the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award, but his victory in this summer’s Tour was dogged by innuendo that his dominant performance, and that of his team, Team Sky, must be shaped by drug use, something he has repeatedly and passionately denied. Calling his accusers “wankers” – not for the first time – Wiggins describes the corrosive legacy of Armstrong, newly stripped of his seven Tour wins because of his endemic, team-wide doping regime. “It wasn’t a surprise,” Wiggins says of the report that damned the Texan. “The anger is more: I’ve got to pick up the pieces. He’s still a multimillionaire, and he’s not here to answer the questions. I can’t not answer them because I’ve got to go and race next year, and I hate talking about it.”

Armstrong was never his hero. “He was someone I respected and admired. I’ve met quite a few sportsmen, but I don’t think I’ve met anybody as … powerful as him.” He describes Armstrong as “quite an intimidating person to be around” and someone who exists in a cosseted bubble of entourages and chauffeur-driven cars. “If I’m going to Kilburn, I get on a bus. He’d have a car waiting for him with a bodyguard. He’d go to races on a private jet. I take my kids to school. It’s what keeps you normal. I don’t want my kids growing up as fucking idiots, d’you know what I mean?”

Wiggins describes how he is determined to be a good father to his children, Ben and Bella, because of his own experiences growing up. His Australian cyclist father, Garry – “he wasn’t a nice person” – walked out when Wiggins was two, and ended up a violent alcoholic. He died in 2008. “Because of what he did to us, I’m, sort of, the way I am with my own family,” Wiggins says. “I cherish them. It was a lesson of how not to be with my own children. So it’s not ‘like father like son’. It’s the complete opposite … Not having my father around has made me a better person.”

Ben, seven, is a promising junior cyclist. Wiggins says: “I’m not just saying this because he’s my son, but he is fucking good. I think he’ll be better than me. But I’m not pushing him at the moment. I feel sorry for him that he’s my son, because he’ll never get a fair shot; he’ll always be compared to me, which is sad really.”

Wiggins appreciates the attentions of well-wishers but says his new fame brings difficulties, particularly for his family. “They ask your wife to take the photo, which is a bit rude,” he says of some. “After a while that becomes tiresome, especially when you’re having a pizza with your children, or you have to have a photo with somebody else’s kids while yours stand to the side.”

Wiggins describes himself as fundamentally shy and even, to use his wife’s phrase, “emotionally retarded” when it comes to expressing feelings, and he is prone to having a drink if he has to go on stage to talk. In a lull following his three-medal haul from the 2004 Olympics, he had a well-documented period in which he drank heavily. In the interview he describes a period of being “bored shitless”, often arriving at his local pub when it opened and gaining weight: “I got quite big. I wasn’t huge. I was probably 83 kilos (13 stone).”

Lack of money was one of the post-Olympic depressions faced by Wiggins, he says: “It got me down. You think if you win the Olympics, you’ll become a millionaire overnight. But I was still scraping the barrel, looking down the back of the settee for pound coins to buy a pint of milk.”

It remains to be seen if Wiggins will even race in next year’s Tour, with the Giro d’Italia his stated goal for 2013. More unlikely sounding is the notion, floated in his autobiography, that he could compete at the Rio Olympics in 2016 in a completely different sport. “Imagine that, going and winning the coxless lightweight four: Olympic gold in rowing four years off.”

Napolitano to visit family of slain Arizona Border Patrol agent – CNN International

Category : Stocks


ABC News
Napolitano to visit family of slain Arizona Border Patrol agent
CNN International
(CNN) — The head of Homeland Security travels to Arizona Friday, a day after Mexican authorities questioned two men in a shooting that killed a US Border Patrol agent and wounded another near the US-Mexican border. The Mexican army handed the two over
Border patrol death: a case of friendly fire?NBCNews.com
Border Patrol Agent Killing: Friendly Fire?ABC News (blog)
Family describes slain border agent in Arizona as a heroReuters
CBS News

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Former Clinton economic adviser Laura D’Andrea Tyson describes how the “vicious circle” of income inequality leads to educational inequality, which then perpetuates the wealth gaps in the U.S. Tyson also notes how poverty is much higher in…

Category : Stocks, World News

Former Clinton economic adviser Laura D’Andrea Tyson describes how the “vicious circle” of income inequality leads to educational inequality, which then perpetuates the wealth gaps in the U.S. Tyson also notes how poverty is much higher in single-parent families than in those with married parents. But while she wants to increase taxes for the rich and pour money into education, she stops short of advocating policies to strengthen marriage. 47 comments!

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It’s always struck as curious the way capitalists (at least nominally so) put their faith in a group of Beijing Mandarins to guide the Chinese economy into just the right spot. Goldman’s Paul O’Neill describes the government’s muted response to the…

Category : World News

It’s always struck as curious the way capitalists (at least nominally so) put their faith in a group of Beijing Mandarins to guide the Chinese economy into just the right spot. Goldman’s Paul O’Neill describes the government’s muted response to the severe growth slowdown as maybe a clever way of achieving the vaunted rebalancing of the economy. (latest

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Bad loans hit Co-operative Group

Category : World News

The Co-operative Group reports a sharp fall in profits due to bad business loans and what it describes as a “competitive” food market.

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United Church Elects New Moderator

Category : Stocks, World News

OTTAWA, ONTARIO–(Marketwire – Aug. 17, 2012) - A Vancouver-based minister who describes himself as a passionate preacher and poet, the Rev. Dr. Gary Paterson was elected Moderator of The United Church of Canada by the 41st General Council on August 16, 2012.

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"Would Americans accept ‘Socialized Medicine’?" asks Princeton economist Uwe Reinhardt in the NYT. They already do – "the vast health system" that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs operates, which Reinhardt describes as the…

Category : Stocks, World News

“Would Americans accept ‘Socialized Medicine’?” asks Princeton economist Uwe Reinhardt in the NYT. They already do – “the vast health system” that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs operates, which Reinhardt describes as the “purest form of socialized medicine.” The VA system is also one that neither political party would ever seek to privatize. 7 comments!

Read the rest here: "Would Americans accept ‘Socialized Medicine’?" asks Princeton economist Uwe Reinhardt in the NYT. They already do – "the vast health system" that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs operates, which Reinhardt describes as the…

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