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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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Workers ‘losing track of pensions’

Category : Business, World News

People changing jobs are losing track of their clutch of workplace pension pots – making retirement planning more difficult, a charity says.

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Dear Jeremy – your work issues solved

Category : Business

Problems at work? Need advice? Our agony uncle – and readers – have the answer

How do I get useful feedback when my boss underrates me?

I have been at my present company for four years and was employed in a senior position but as a junior compared to my peers. I am in my early 30s and my peers are all in their mid-to-late 40s. Each year we have a performance review, and all employees in the same job group are given a score by their line manager which helps determine bonus and salary increases.

For the past four years I have been given a below average score but I am still assessed to be performing and delivering on expectations. One of my female colleagues in the same team received a much higher score than me this year; I feel that my performance went unnoticed. I confronted my line manager about this and the conversation turned into him asking me questions so that I could self-reflect. He also implied that I should not be “bitter and twisted” about the results and that worrying about it will weigh heavily on me in the future.

What should I do to get some useful feedback on how to improve my performance and/or the perceptions of me in the organisation?

Jeremy says

I can fully understand your sense of frustration. It is bad management on your line manager’s part to be so miserly with his feedback. But I’d strongly advise you not to complain about him. You’d be better advised, at least to start with, to try to understand the underlying reasons for his unhelpfulness.

I’d be pretty sure that he is encouraging you to “self-reflect” in the hope that you’ll come to certain conclusions about your manner and your performance because he’s trying to avoid having to spell them out to you. I

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Morrisons reports fall in profits

Category : World News

Supermarket chain Morrisons reports a fall in full-year profits after “a difficult year”, and says it will start selling food online in 2014.

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Morrisons reports fall in profits

Category : World News

Supermarket chain Morrisons reports a fall in full-year profits after “a difficult year”, and says it will start selling food online in 2014.

Originally posted here: Morrisons reports fall in profits

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Public finances in January surplus

Category : Business, World News

The UK’s public finances were in surplus by a better-than-expected £11.4bn in January, but economists fear it will still be difficult for the chancellor to meet borrowing targets.

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After the Hutton inquiry, how can any broadcaster claim to be free?

Category : Business

TV and radio journalists insist Leveson-style statutory regulation does not hamper them. But history (and Lord Patten) disagrees

Passionate broadcasters – including Greg Dyke and Kevin Marsh – write a letter to the Times hailing the wonders of the tighter regulation they work with, duly underpinned by statute. Nevertheless, they say, “our industry has a proud record of independent, challenging journalism – calling the rich and powerful to account without fear or favour”. So settle down, you restive print guys, as the Leveson debate moves on. “The suggestion that such regulation is inevitably anathema to free speech, or automatically places us under the thumb of politicians, is wrong and insulting to us as fellow journalists.”

At which point, probably unwittingly, they illuminate an absolutely critical divide. No one would remotely call Greg or Kevin (when one was DG at the BBC and the other his chosen editor at Today) anything but proud and challenging. Of course much TV and radio journalism is fine, professional work. We’re not talking sheep and goats here. Good journalism exists across the media spectrum.

But surely Greg Dyke and Kevin Marsh remember the catastrophe of Andrew Gilligan, David Kelly and the Hutton report? Surely Kevin remembers the Downing Street waves that lapped around him? And surely Greg remembers the vote by the BBC governors – chaired then by a former chief whip – that swept him out of office?

It might be helpful at this difficult stage if lovers of editorial freedom rattled the chains that tie them down rather than demanded more chains for everyone. It was the current chairman of the BBC Trust who said, on the record, that the corporation couldn’t have broken either the MPs’ expenses story or the phone-hacking scandal. Too difficult, too strained, for the rulebook. An admission that some stories too close to the seats of power can only be followed, not set in train.

And making that point doesn’t, for a second, run the letter-writers down. It just defines the whole debate we ought to be having.

Barclays chief to waive his bonus

Category : World News

The chief executive of Barclays, Antony Jenkins, is to waive his bonus of about £1m following a “difficult” year for the bank.

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VIDEO: Pawn shops prosper in hard times

Category : World News

The pawnbroker shop is making a widespread comeback as the difficult economic conditions continue to squeeze household incomes.

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Queen finally finds out why no one saw the financial crisis coming

Category : Business

Her Majesty gets the answer to her question – four years after she asked it – on a tour of the Bank of England

One doesn’t normally keep the Queen waiting. But on Thursday Her Majesty finally received an answer to a question she first asked four years ago: why did nobody notice the “awful” financial crisis earlier?

As she toured the Bank of England’s gold vault, Sujit Kapadia, an economist and one of the Bank’s top financial policy experts, stopped the Queen to say he

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