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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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Hefazat-e Islam: Islamist coalition – BBC News

Category : Stocks


BBC News
Hefazat-e Islam: Islamist coalition
BBC News
The Hefazat-e Islam is a tightly-knit coalition of a dozen or so Islamist organisations which have come together under one umbrella only in recent years. It has traditionally not sought power through elections, but looks to use its street muscle to change
Bangladesh protests: at least 15 killed as police clash with demonstratorsThe Guardian
Bangladeshi capital wears an eerie calm a day after Islamists battle policeCNN
15 Dead in Bangladesh Anti-Blasphemy Protests – VOAVoice of America
euronews

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Chad says it killed Algeria hostage mastermind in Mali – Reuters

Category : Stocks


The Guardian
Chad says it killed Algeria hostage mastermind in Mali
Reuters
By Madjiasra Nako. Sat Mar 2, 2013 9:00pm EST. N'DJAMENA (Reuters) – Chadian soldiers in Mali have killed Mokhtar Belmokhtar, the al Qaeda commander who masterminded a bloody hostage-taking at an Algerian gas plant in January, Chad's military
Islamist militant Mokhtar Belmokhtar 'killed in Mali'BBC News
Head of Chadian Army Claims Troops Kill BelmoktarABC News
Islamist leader Mokhtar Belmokhtar killed in Mali: ChadAFP
The Independent

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Abu Hamza among five terror suspects extradited to US – BBC News

Category : Stocks


BBC News
Abu Hamza among five terror suspects extradited to US
BBC News
Five terror suspects, including the radical cleric Abu Hamza al-Masri, have flown out of the UK on a jet bound for the United States. Officers from Scotland Yard's extradition unit handed the men to US marshals at RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk.
REFILE-UPDATE 3-Britain extradites Islamist cleric to United StatesReuters
Radical preacher Hamza extradited to USThe News International
Five Terror Suspects Depart Britain to Face US ChargesVoice of America (blog)
CNN

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2 Islamist Militias Disband in Libya Amid Anger Over Killings – New York Times

Category : Stocks


Brisbane Times
2 Islamist Militias Disband in Libya Amid Anger Over Killings
New York Times
BENGHAZI, Libya — Two Islamist militias in the eastern city of Darnah announced Saturday that they were disbanding, bowing to a wave of antimilitia anger that has swept parts of Libya since a deadly attack on an American diplomatic mission on Sept. 11.
Militants or no, Islamist fighters praised at Benghazi hospitalReuters India
Protesters killed in attackDetroit Free Press
Libyan citizens protest militia groupsCBS News
Reuters

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Blow to Transition as Court Dissolves Egypt’s Parliament – New York Times

Category : Stocks


New York Times
Blow to Transition as Court Dissolves Egypt's Parliament
New York Times
CAIRO — A panel of judges appointed by Egypt's ousted president, Hosni Mubarak, threw the nation's troubled transition to democracy into grave doubt Thursday with rulings that dissolved the popularly elected Parliament and allowed the toppled
Egypt court orders parliament dissolvedLubbockOnline.com
Egypt court dissolves Islamist-led parliamentSalt Lake Tribune
Egyptian court dissolves Islamist-led parliamentThe Detroit News
CBC.ca

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Regional rise of the Muslim Brotherhood – BBC News

Category : Stocks


BBC News
Regional rise of the Muslim Brotherhood
BBC News
By Yolande Knell BBC News, Cairo Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood is the grandfather of Islamist groups in the Middle East. Since the organisation was set up in Ismailia in 1928, its influence has spread across the region and the Arab uprisings of 2011 have
Mohammed Morsi: Brotherhood's backroom operator in the limelightThe Guardian
Egypt vote: Brotherhood advances to second round The Associated Press
Islamist leads in president pollThe Press Association
ABC Online

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In Egyptian Hard-Liner’s Surge, New Worries for the Muslim Brotherhood – New York Times

Category : Stocks


Sydney Morning Herald
In Egyptian Hard-Liner's Surge, New Worries for the Muslim Brotherhood
New York Times
CAIRO — Hazem Salah Abu Ismail is an old-school Islamist. He wants to move toward abolishing Egypt's peace treaty with Israel and cites Iran as a successful model of independence from Washington. He worries about the mixing of the genders in the
Egypt Islamists Criticized Over Seeking PresidencyWall Street Journal
Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood to field presidential candidateCNN International
Muslim Brotherhood Candidate to Run in EgyptBusinessWeek
Washington Post

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Neoliberals, not Islamists, are the real threat to Tunisia | Matt Kennard

Category : Business

With Tunisia’s economy in crisis, the Islamist party Ennahda should look beyond US and Bretton Woods principles to save it

I meet Mustafa and Kamal on Avenue Bourguiba, where they protested in January 2011 to get rid of the dictator who ruled their country with an iron-fist for 23 years. Tunisia has changed a lot since then – and celebrated its 56th independence day last week as a free nation. Both men said they will be out again to consolidate the gains of the revolution. “We couldn’t have [talked like this] before, no way,” says Mustafa, a 25-year-old originally from Tabarka in the north of Tunisia. “The only thing I could have told you is how great Ben Ali is, what a good man he is.”

But how independent is free Tunisia from the grips of its former colonial master and its allies? A demonstration last week by a group of fringe fundamentalists calling for sharia law has got some secular Tunisians in a funk again, as well as worrying the French, who are opposed to Ennahda. An opposition politician told me there are even rumours of a French-supported coup. It is clear that the next stage of western connivance in the subjugation of the Tunisian people is the widespread media and political fear over the democratically elected Ennahda party, which is Islamist. But despite constant derision by the western media, Ennahda revealed on Monday that they would not make sharia, or Islamic law, the main source of legislation for the new constitution. Wouldn’t it be better to judge them on their actions rather than conspiracies about their intentions? “We realise we have a historic responsibility to get this right, we are genuinely inclusive,” Said Ferjani, who sits on the Ennahda politburo, told me.

The course from actively arming a kleptocratic dictator to pushing for the Tunisians to support “western values” is familiar. As Frantz Fanon wrote in The Wretched of the Earth: “As soon as the native begins to pull on his moorings, and to cause anxiety to the settler, he is handed over to well-meaning souls who … point out to him the specificity and wealth of western values.”

Initially, when people were getting shot by snipers on the streets of Tunis, Hillary Clinton, said the US “didn’t want to take sides” and was worried about the “unrest and instability”. Sarkozy’s administration even offered to send police advisers to Ben Ali to quell the uprising. In the end, over 200 perished. Since the revolution has won out, Clinton and Sarkozy have moved on to praising “progress” in the country while also expressing apparent concern that Ennahda don’t impose Iranian-style dictatorship on the Tunisian people (the US or French didn’t care when it was Pinochet-style dictatorship).

But the fear of Ennahda is misplaced, and based on western desires to remain in firm control. There are plenty of clear differences in Tunisia to 1979 when the Iranian revolution overthrew another western-backed torturing tyrant, the Shah. First, Ennahda have assembled a coalition including secular socialists and social democrats to form their government. The president Moncef Marzouki is a secular human-rights activist who spent decades in the wilderness fighting the US-backed atrocities being committed against dissidents in Tunisia.

The second point is that Tunisian civil society is engaged with the process and will only grow. One of the retrograde patterns you see in a Middle East speckled with US-backed dictatorships is that Islamism is often the only avenue to express dislike of the current state of affairs. The space for secular left movements has been completely crushed since the pan-Arabism of Nasser in Egypt worried the US enough to extinguish the left across the region. Clearly what scares the west more than any Islamist, then, is a secular revolutionary left opposed to the neoliberal order we set up over the past 40 years. That would really hurt the bottom line.

Islamists themselves have often been quite welcoming to the model of the Bretton Woods institutions and with the neoliberal order trying to impose itself on Tunisia, it will be near-impossible for the ruling parties to try something else (even if they want to). Ennahda at the moment has no discernible economic programme, and talked to me mainly about how much it wanted to attract foreign investment, rather than launching on the massive public works initiative that the country really needs. So far, Tunisia has followed US and Bretton Woods dictates to the book, privatising many of its state-owned assets and eviscerating public institutions and subsidies for fuel and food. Many actually compare Ennahda to the Justice and Development party (AKP) in Turkey, and it is no secret that the AKP has been a dream for business and international capital.

In its time in power, the AKP privatised a raft of public assets including Tekel, the state-owned tobacco and alcohol company, which it agreed to sell off as part of the “structural adjustments” attached to a $16bn loan agreement with the IMF. Before Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the prime minister, started acting like the new sultan, the business press was in raptures about the AKP. This is why I worry for Tunisia – not because of Islamists, but because of neoliberals. With the period of dictatorship over, the economy in Tunisia is now the big issue – with high unemployment everyone here talks jobs. Bretton Woods dictates have proven a disaster around the world as a development model. Ennahda should look elsewhere, for its own survival.

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Boko Haram ends talks with Nigeria government

Category : World News

Radical Islamist sect says it has “closed all possible doors” to negotiations with government of “unbelievers”.

Link: Boko Haram ends talks with Nigeria government

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Al-Shabab claims Mogadishu car bomb

Category : World News

Islamist group claims responsibility for blast in Somali capital that targeted security forces and injured two people.

Here is the original post: Al-Shabab claims Mogadishu car bomb

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