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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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Intergraph(R) CAESAR II(R) and PV Elite(R) Enhancing Knowledge and Productivity for Ford, Bacon & Davis Engineers

Category : Stocks

HOUSTON, TX–(Marketwire – Feb 26, 2013) – Intergraph has published a new case study on how CAESAR II and PV Elite are helping Ford, Bacon & Davis LLC perform fast and accurate stress analyses of piping, vessels, and related equipment to ensure that its clients’ facilities are designed to code, avoiding potentially costly errors, delays, and risks during construction and operation. The case discusses how the ease-of-use and built-in intelligence of CAESAR II and PV Elite are helping the Ford, Bacon & Davis entry-level and even more experienced stress engineers develop the knowledge and experience they need for their jobs, enhancing productivity for the firm and its clients and other stakeholders. It also describes how the software’s user-friendly output format, color-coded stress visuals, and animated models provide a visual representation of all of the stresses, making it easier for a non-technical client to quickly see the importance of designing to code. This speeds up the reviews and client approvals significantly.

See original here: Intergraph(R) CAESAR II(R) and PV Elite(R) Enhancing Knowledge and Productivity for Ford, Bacon & Davis Engineers

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Southeast Asia Lures Private Equity, but Dealmaking Challenges Grow, Says New Report

Category : World News

Region’s Rising Wealth and Resources Appeal to Growth Investors, but Acquisitions Depend on Local Knowledge and Solid Execution to Succeed, Says The Boston Consulting Group

Go here to read the rest: Southeast Asia Lures Private Equity, but Dealmaking Challenges Grow, Says New Report

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City of Denton Selects ITinvolve for Social Knowledge Management, Change Management

Category : World News

ITinvolve Delivers Operational Insight and Visibility to Manage Knowledge and Changes in Complex IT Environments, Dramatically Improving Service Delivery

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Going for broke: how universities can deliver on their economic potential

Category : Business

UK universities have the opportunity of a generation to build a sustainable economy for the 21st century, but they need to invest in infrastructure, business collaboration and in their people

Let me start by saying that I am not a proponent of directing academics away from blue-sky research towards second-rate contract research for the highest bidder. I am passionate about the long-term economic, social and cultural value of intellectual exploration through curiosity-driven research. But there seems to be a commonly held view that if you wish to preserve academic freedom, it’s impossible to provide any substantial economic benefit to the UK, and that attempting to do so will create profound damage to our research base. I simply don’t buy that argument.

The UK needs an economic game changer and we are incredibly fortunate to have a platform from which we can launch it – our universities. We already make a major contribution to GDP yet we can do much more if academics engage even more extensively with business. We should be using the base of our higher education sector to help our businesses innovate and grow, to encourage overseas corporations to invest in the UK and to create jobs for UK citizens. Many academics already do collaborate with business, recognising that it can enrich and enhance the quality of scholarly work. Such interactions will become increasingly important if we are to remain competitive in the global business that is higher education.

The government started well in 2010 by protecting the research budget – a tall order but essential given that our competitors are investing much more into research. What is frustrating is we are not joined-up in using our assets for the best interests of the UK. Research activity generates highly trained staff, as well as data, knowledge, and intellectual property (IP), and we should use them to our competitive advantage. We all know the benefits of seeing new developments, from academics who attend the latest conference to see unpublished work to businesses who have always recognised the importance of technology adoption and first-mover advantage. Recognising the value to business of access to our research first is a no brainer.

The question, then, is why, when we create some of the best knowledge and IP in the world, are we intent on pursuing initiatives such as Easy Access IP and gold open access, without giving due consideration to the benefits for our economy. I am not opposed to the underlying principles of these initiatives, but in some cases they are unnecessary and in others they are unlikely to work. At worst they could mean that, as a nation, we will spend more money, do less research and accrue less economic benefit for the UK. In my view, we can be smarter than this and use these assets as part of a package of measures to collectively make the UK the most attractive place for businesses committed to generating jobs and growth here.

What then should we be doing? We should create a network of research and innovation enterprise zones across the nation; places where large corporations could work alongside SMEs and university researchers from across sectors, rubbing shoulders, exchanging ideas and researching and innovating together. This would generate exciting new discoveries and then ensure their transformation at lightning speed into products, jobs and growth in the UK, for the UK. I’m not simply talking about science parks – but genuine research and innovation accelerators, promoting inward investment on scale and generating thousands of jobs.

The government would need to offer significant incentives to achieve this goal, perhaps including reduced corporation tax and flexibility on VAT to allow sharing of spaces. University researchers could make their research outputs preferentially available for a fixed period, perhaps alongside the embargo period of a green open access policy, providing an early view and hence opportunities for early uptake. We could also use these zones to pilot new ideas to liberate us from the stranglehold of red tape and burdensome regulation around employment law, immigration policies, procurement and others, which currently inhibit entrepreneurs and stifle growth.

Finally, the main assets of our universities are our people. It is people who innovate, collaborate and discover, not institutions. We need to nurture this talent and to boost innovation through enabling academics to gain exposure to new and different techniques in different settings. We need to enable people from across universities – from professors, to post-docs and PhD students – to move more freely amongst different types of institutions than is currently possible. We could establish a scheme whereby high-fliers rotate around a selection of small business, larger companies and university research departments to gain a variety of experience to develop new ways of innovating.

We are going to see profound changes in the next few years. The shift in economic power is clear and growing – and the signs are there for similar shifts in the global higher education market. We can chose to maintain a 19th century view of higher education, or we can recognise academic research can be enhanced by serious collaboration with external enterprises. We must be bold and recognise that the depth of our knowledge base provides a competitive advantage that most countries are desperately trying to emulate, because they know that it creates enormous economic, social and cultural value. We have the opportunity of a generation to build a sustainable economy for the 21st century – but we need to open our eyes and seize the opportunity.

Professor Stephen Caddick is vice-provost (Enterprise) and Vernon professor of chemistry at University College London.

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional. To get more articles like this direct to your inbox, become a member of the Higher Education Network.

Spain will ask for an EU bailout, but not until private-sector audits of its banks (expected by June 21) give a better idea of the amount of capital necessary, according to several sources with knowledge of the just-completed conference call. IMF…

Category : Stocks, World News

Spain will ask for an EU bailout, but not until private-sector audits of its banks (expected by June 21) give a better idea of the amount of capital necessary, according to several sources with knowledge of the just-completed conference call. IMF number-crunchers say the amount will be between €40-80B. El Mundo reports the rescue will come without conditions. 8 comments!

Read more: Spain will ask for an EU bailout, but not until private-sector audits of its banks (expected by June 21) give a better idea of the amount of capital necessary, according to several sources with knowledge of the just-completed conference call. IMF…

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5 Stocks With Unusual Insider Buying

Category : Business

WINDERMERE, Fla. (Stockpickr) — Corporate insiders sell their own companies’ stock for a number of reasons.

They might need the cash for a big personal purchase such as a new house or yacht, or they might need the cash to fund a charity. Sometimes they sell as part of a planned selling program that they have put in place for diversification purposes, which allows them to sell stock in stages instead of selling all at one price.

Other times they sell because they think their stock is overvalued and the risk/reward is no longer attractive. Some even dump their own stock because they have inside knowledge that a competitor is eating their lunch and stealing market share. …

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Mapping out Asia’s future

Category : World News

The title poses a question with an obvious answer; a rising China is increasingly eclipsing Japan and seems destined to become the hegemonic power in Asia. So why read this book about old news? One reason is that the author succinctly assesses the rise of both nations, elucidates the respective strengths and weaknesses of the two economies that account for more than 75 percent of Asian GDP and presents scenarios for how regional rivalry will evolve over coming decades. Busy readers who want to quickly get up to speed on East Asia will learn much from this slim volume, one brimming with a veteran observer’s insights and knowledge.
Meyer questions the popular view that “Asia’s future is already mapped out, between the ineluctable decline of Japan on the one hand and the irresistible rise of China and India on the other.” China has overtaken Japan as the world’s second largest economy, but Meyer reminds us that tales of Japan’s decline are overstated and it retains economic and financial domination of Asia.

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Letters: World Bank reform

Category : Business

Peter Chowla missed many of the World Bank’s recent reforms (Comment, April 14). Increasingly, the World Bank is seen as a transparency leader. Publish What You Fund has rated the Bank “best performer” in terms of aid transparency out of 58 donors for two years running. And the Centre for Global Development and the Brookings Institution both ranked the Bank’s Fund for the Poorest, IDA, as a top donor in transparency and learning. The Bank recently added an additional seat on our board for sub-Saharan Africa, to increase the voice of developing countries. About half of our senior officers are women; almost half are from developing countries. Key donors give the Bank high marks. At their request, we’re helping 130 developing countries on climate change adaptation and mitigation. The Bank’s open data initiative has unlocked our world-class knowledge and development data. We now provide free access to more than 8,000 indicators, including GDP data and development statistics. And last week we announced a new open access policy for our research outputs and knowledge products. Finally, our shareholders provided us record financial support during the global economic crisis. All of this highlights a changing institution with growing, not declining impact.
Cyril Muller
Vice-president, external affairs, World Bank, Washington DC

3rd Annual Home Builder’s Association Home & Garden Expo April 21st & 22nd

Category : World News

Carolina Blinds will be attending the 3rd Annual Home Builder’s Association Home & Garden Expo which will display products for building, remodeling, gardening, and the knowledge and service from specialized professionals.

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Lois Thompson, CLC, Named a VIP Member of Worldwide Who’s Who for Excellence in Health and Wellness

Category : World News

Lois Thompson has combined her knowledge and skill sets to create a unique holistic health modality

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