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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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Harper Government Invests in Marketing Opportunities for Horticulture Sector

Category : Stocks, World News

TORONTO, ONTARIO–(Marketwire – March 16, 2013) - Canadian horticulture growers are working to expand into new markets abroad with the support of the Harper Government. Member of Parliament Ted Opitz (Etobicoke Centre), on behalf of Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz, announced today an investment to help the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association increase international demand for Canada’s hardy and diverse horticulture exports. The announcement was made today at Canada Blooms, the largest flower and garden festival in the country.

Read the original: Harper Government Invests in Marketing Opportunities for Horticulture Sector

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Nokia Music, SPIN, and SomeSuch & Co Celebrate the Premiere of "New American Noise" During Launch Event in Park City, Utah

Category : Stocks, World News

“New American Noise” — a Film Series Revealing the Burgeoning Music Landscape in America Launched During 2013 Sundance Film Festival Friday, January 18th With Attendees Lil John, Adrian Grenier, Melanie Fiona and More; Series Now Available to View in Its Entirety at www.sundancechannel.com/nokia

View post: Nokia Music, SPIN, and SomeSuch & Co Celebrate the Premiere of "New American Noise" During Launch Event in Park City, Utah

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IBC 2012: Conax Secures Future Growth With Revitalized Brand and Future-Driven Solutions

Category : Stocks, World News

Positioned for Strengthened Role in Value Chain — at the Heart of the Evolving New Media Landscape

Read more here: IBC 2012: Conax Secures Future Growth With Revitalized Brand and Future-Driven Solutions

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This mining in the Moors row exposes a deeper environmental offensive | Richard Seymour

Category : Business

The coalition’s encouragement of developers such as York Potash forms part of a neoliberal assault on the environment

I recently took a trip through the Moors, en route to Whitby. The train from Middlesbrough meandered through miles of lavish Yorkshire countryside, stopping at tiny hamlets like Castleton Moor, and Ruswarp.

It was positively barbaric. Yes, the cottages are beautiful, but try getting a signal on your mobile. And if you do get a signal, try ordering a delivery from Ocado. This isn’t entirely metropolitan snobbery. Whitby, a grand seaside town, is also the only town I’ve visited where “golliwogs” can still be won in arcade games.

Now they want to dig up this achingly lush landscape for some potash, a fertiliser ingredient. Imagine my sorrow. Sarcasm aside, the 11 local organisations now opposing this development have a real grievance. This will be one of the biggest mines of its kind in the world, and will despoil 4.5 hectares of the 100 hectares of forestry already owned by York Potash, a subsidiary of the mineral mining company Sirius. The landscape is not only of aesthetic value, but also provides carbon storage, biodiversity and forms a natural flood defence, all of which are difficult to put a cash value on.

Sirius promises that any negative effects will be outweighed by the creation of 1,000 new jobs. This is always the fastest route to the moral high ground for mining and development capital. Thus, some of the opposition from environmental campaigners hinges on the prospective damage to the economy, particularly tourism. But this merely highlights the false nature of the dilemma – growth versus sustainability– posed by mining interests.

The real underlying issue in this, as in most controversies related to the exploitation of natural resources, is democracy. As George Monbiot has argued: “The first prerequisite for protecting the environment is a functioning democracy.” Whether it is in Brazil, India, Canada, or Britain, the struggles that take place are invariably over who gets the final say in what is done with the planet’s wealth.

Take, for example, the Rio Tinto potash mine in Mendoza, Argentina, which was approved last month. Opposition centred on potential environmental damage and the creation of salt waste deposits that would pollute the drinking water. Rio Tinto was not trusted by locals to keep the area safe and clean. In addition, the opposition felt that they should have a say in how the country’s resources were exploited. This environmentalism of the poor is sometimes erroneously called “resource nationalism”: it is just a matter of democracy.

On the face of it, mining in the Moors is a different proposition. The major objection is that it’s taking place in a national park, conserved for the benefit of the public: a blot on a beautiful landscape. Surely the opposition is conservative and romantic? But taken as part of the government’s wider strategy for development we can see that similar issues are at stake.

This government is engaged in a hasty retreat from environmental commitments regarding regional development. The potash development follows the abolition of the Regional Spatial Strategies inherited from the last government that, while foregrounding industrial development, included targets for the reduction of greenhouse gases and the development of sustainable industry.

Furthermore, the government is intent on handing more leverage to business in how development takes place. Regional development agencies funded by central government were disbanded in this government’s Public Bodies Bill as part of a wider offensive against the public sector. The bill also included a plan to sell off the national forests to private developers, a controversial proposal abandoned at the last minute. These agencies have been replaced by local enterprise partnerships, which are not funded by central government but involve voluntary relationships between local governments and businesses.

As a result, local authorities wishing to generate income and encourage development must subordinate everything to creating a convivial environment for investors. The York and North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership naturally makes the potash extraction industry a central component of its growth strategy. You can hardly blame them – there aren’t many other opportunities coming in areas, particularly Scarborough and Whitby, hit hard by spending cuts.

So, here is the problem. Two major developments of neoliberalism obstruct environmental justice. First, neoliberal reform has been hollowing out what little democracy parliament affords us, the shift from quangos to voluntary coalitions between government and capital merely confirming popular exclusion from decision-making. Second, when the economy provides few investment opportunities, neoliberalism offers “accumulation by dispossession”; turning over previously public goods, whether hospitals or park land, to private profit. This can always be presented as “creating jobs”.

The only answer to this is to assert popular sovereignty over the environment. On that account alone, it would be a step forward if Yorkshire residents stopped the potash mine.

Donald Ray Bernard: Creating Jobs and Changing the Economic Landscape From Diamonds in the Rough

Category : Stocks

NAABO.ORG Is Recognizing Donald Ray Bernard for Creating Jobs and Expanding the Landscape for New Opportunities for Potential Workers

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Watergate changed US politics – Hattiesburg American

Category : Stocks


Sydney Morning Herald
Watergate changed US politics
Hattiesburg American
It ended with the fall of a president and a scandal that echoes in American culture four decades later. The time was just after 1 am 40 years ago today when a security guard at the Watergate Complex in Washington, DC, discovered adhesive tape covering
Watergate scandal changed the political landscape foreverUSA TODAY
Tantalizing What If's 40 Years After WatergateABC News
Parker: Watergate, in all its sleazeAlbany Times Union
Washington Post

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Proxy advisor ISS yesterday recommended that [[AOL]] shareholders vote for 2 out of 3 board candidates nominated by activist investor Starboard Value, which has criticized AOL’s content investments. While ISS said the Patch local news network may…

Category : World News

Proxy advisor ISS yesterday recommended that AOL shareholders vote for 2 out of 3 board candidates nominated by activist investor Starboard Value, which has criticized AOL’s content investments. While ISS said the Patch local news network may need more patience, “getting the business model right is (probably) more important than blanketing the landscape.” Post your comment!

See the original post here: Proxy advisor ISS yesterday recommended that [[AOL]] shareholders vote for 2 out of 3 board candidates nominated by activist investor Starboard Value, which has criticized AOL’s content investments. While ISS said the Patch local news network may…

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Tune Out Facebook; Tune In Sirius, Pandora

Category : Stocks

NEW YORK (TheStreet) – With all the excitement surrounding Facebook’s Friday IPO, I was not surprised to see the trading volume of SiriusXM drop by almost half from Thursday.

Granted, Thursday was an exceptionally busy for investors, however, with the cliff dive the stock price experienced Thursday, a busier Friday was expected. Thursday marked only the third day this year the price closed below the 200-day moving average, a significantly bearish warning to investors.

I have followed and written about Sirius for a little over a year now. I’ve seen the most unique aspect of the stock is not the stock itself, but rather the passionate core of retail investors. As a result, I attempt to provide the very best view of the landscape possible. …

Click to view a price quote on FB.

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A postcard from Kauai’s ‘South Pacific’ paradise

Category : World News

Those who know me know I tend to pick up and go quite easily, as the travel bug has never loosened its hold. This time, I’ve made the ultimate getaway to paradise to escape my regular routine of work and college. I’m talking about Kauai, Hawaii.
I remember looking out the window of the plane to see a lush landscape, one unlike anything at home in Los Angeles — and I was startled how close to the water we were as we touched down at Lihue Airport.

Read more from the original source: A postcard from Kauai’s ‘South Pacific’ paradise

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‘More needed’ to help create jobs

Category : Business, World News

Business leaders urge ministers to do more to help companies create a “pro-employment landscape” as a change to employment law comes into force.

See the rest here: ‘More needed’ to help create jobs

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