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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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Google set to unveil subscriptions for specialist YouTube videos – CNN International

Category : Stocks


NEWS.com.au
Google set to unveil subscriptions for specialist YouTube videos
CNN International
(Financial Times) — Google is on the verge of unveiling an à la carte subscription service for some of YouTube's specialist video channels, to finance a broader range of content and add a second revenue stream to the digital video market leader. The move
Rumor: YouTube to Launch Pay-For Channel Subscriptions – GizmodoGizmodo
Are You Ready to Pay for YouTube?The Atlantic Wire
YouTube to introduce paid subscriptionsNEWS.com.au
Seeking Alpha

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Grand Campus Living Development Wins Innovator Award

Category : Stocks, World News

DALLAS, TX–(Marketwired – Apr 25, 2013) – On April 11th, 2013 the third annual InterFace Student Housing conference took place at the Hilton Austin in Austin, TX. The 2013 Innovator Awards were distributed to companies who demonstrated excellence and innovation in student housing. Grand Campus Living, a division of Lincoln Property Company, won “Best New Development of a Property with Fewer Than 200 Beds.” Grand Campus Living, alongside development partner Fountains Residential Partners, earned this distinction for their development The Vue in Fort Worth, TX. As the recipient of one of only three awards given for new off-campus housing, Grand Campus Living has established itself as a leader in student living and housing development.

Originally posted here: Grand Campus Living Development Wins Innovator Award

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Check Point Software Technologies Reports 2013 First Quarter Financial Results

Category : World News

SAN CARLOS, CA–(Marketwired – Apr 22, 2013) – Check Point® Software Technologies Ltd. (NASDAQ: CHKP), the worldwide leader in securing the Internet, today announced its financial results for the first quarter ending March 31, 2013.

The rest is here: Check Point Software Technologies Reports 2013 First Quarter Financial Results

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Marjorie Scardino: business leaders will back EU in the end

Category : Business

Former Pearson CEO draws parallels between Europe and US and says current government is ‘pandering to Ukip’

Dame Marjorie Scardino, the first woman chief executive of a FTSE 100 company, has said she believes the UK business community will ultimately back the European Union in any referendum on Britain’s membership.

Scardino, who was chief executive of Financial Times and Penguin owner Pearson for 16 years until the end of 2012, said she thought business leaders were intelligent enough to know where their best interests lay, which was in closer European integration – even though her faith in the British business community generally was “at a nadir”.

“I think they will be for Europe in the end. I think the business community is smart enough to realise that just having a trade union is not enough,” she said. “They are smart enough to know they need to be part of a union that has political and financial power.”

In January, David Cameron announced that if the Conservatives won the next election, they would hold an in-out referendum on Britain’s membership of the EU before the end of 2017.

The prime minister also said that before that he would be seeking a new settlement between the UK and Brussels, through a full treaty renegotiation or other means, to repatriate powers to Britain, and that he wants the EU to abandon its commitment to “ever closer union”.

Scardino made the comments on the EU referendum during a question and answer session after delivering the 2013 Hugo Young lecture in London on Tuesday evening.

In her speech, she said she thought Young, the pro-European former Guardian political columnist who died in 2003, would “likely have scolded the government for pandering to Ukip”.

Scardino, who was born and raised in Texas but has lived in the UK for 20 years, also said the EU was in need of leaders of the stature of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln to help it through its current political and financial malaise.

In a speech that drew comparisons between the EU and the development of the US as a political union over more than two centuries, she added that having a single, strong leader was one of the factors that had helped her native country survive numerous political crises that could have torn it apart, including the civil war.

Answering a question on this point, Scardino said she thought there was a “such a paucity of imagination among politicians and business leaders” responsible for making decisions about the EU’s political and financial future.

“If you don’t have anyone brave enough to say, ‘We’ve got to have something to bind ourselves together,’ you are never going to have [a sense of union like the US has],” she added. “The politics of Europe is unimaginative and bureaucratic.”

However, Scardino said another lesson from the history of the US was that building a union between disparate groups of people takes time, above all else.

She added that the US grew from 13 British colonies that shared a common language and culture, where as the EU was trying to forge closer union from countries that in some cases had been in existence for more than 1,000 years, with “very, very long histories and very well-dug-in legacies”.

“It’s not about legislatures being more compromising; it’s not about anything other than time. It takes a long time to build democracy, to build freedom.”

The annual Hugo Young lecture is organised by the Scott Trust, the owner of the Guardian.

Secret Social Entrepreneur | Why defining social enterprise is important

Category : Business

Explain briefly and clearly what social enterprise is – create a tagline to reflect the ideals of the organisation and its social aims

As a director of a medium-sized social enterprise that delivers youth facilities and services through a customer-focused revenue-generating model, I met recently with the local council leader to seek his support for some new facilities we hope to add.

His opening and rather blunt gambit was to accuse: “If this was a business, you’d be bankrupt”, swiftly followed by every social entrepreneur’s favourite question: “What’s in it for you?”. Ignoring, as I always try to, the urge to ask whether he opened his meetings with local charities in the same way, I countered with a slightly surprised, “well, it is a business, and we’re not!” and proceeded to spend the best part of an hour explaining to him what social enterprise is all about, and how what’s ‘in it for us’ is, heaven forbid, earning a living doing something worthwhile that delivers social value for the community.

Sadly, five years into my social enterprise journey, still being somewhat affronted by this kind of attitude, I am more resigned to it than shocked. It belies a suspicion about social enterprise that those working on the ground in the sector must face and deflect on an almost daily basis. And it continues to reflect a failure, for sure on our part as an organisation, but also collectively as a sector, to get an effective message out there into our communities about what social enterprises are and why we do it.

More than just ignorance, the leader’s questions implied an underlying suspicion about motivations — one that, importantly, serves to differentiate us from the traditional charity sector. On the whole, and certainly at the small-scale community level, directors of charities are not and cannot be paid for their work. This is sufficient to allay suspicions, especially when combined with a model of delivering services for free funded by grants or fundraising. Equally, if we were just charging for services as a private sector company in pursuit of profit, that would be straightforward.

But in social enterprises, even wholly not-for-profit ones like ours, where directors can be paid (even if they often are not), mixing up the commercial approach and the social motivation simply confounds. In the context of an ill-defined, and little-understood model, we must instead be ‘in it for the money’ – a laughable irony that will not be lost on most readers of this column. Or even worse still, in it for the money while pretending to be in it for the social good.

Echoed in this is the hand-wringing debate of the sector’s higher echelons about ‘fake’ social enterprises, and certainly that muddies the waters, but it is not, fundamentally, the point. This leader didn’t ask these questions of me because he was aligning our organisation with some multi-million pound business masquerading as a social enterprise in order to make huge sums out of public sector contracts in health or prison services. Rather he asked because, on the ground, in local communities, the concept of delivering social good in an enterprising way is simply alien.

It matters that we do something to change that. It matters not just because it is demoralising and depressing, but because it is by collaborating and working in partnership that social enterprises and public sector bodies will maximise the social impact they can have. They can only do this if they understand one another and if the communities of which they are an increasingly integral part understand them in turn.

Without this understanding, in which definition plays a key part, social enterprises face an uphill battle against the tide of half-truths and suspicion that is all to quick to fill the clarity void.

While I hesitate to do so, seeking this clarity means entering the lofty discussions that continue unabated, be it in conference halls, meeting rooms, or virtual networks, about defining social enterprise. From my position on the ground, I don’t think this is about the issues that sometimes preoccupy those involved in it – be it about how and why social enterprise matters, deciding on the ‘legitimising’ proportion of traded income or the distinctions between companies limited by shares or by guarantee.

What we need is to develop and use a simple tagline that encapsulates in a nutshell what social enterprise is all about. Most importantly of all, we need to communicate that message widely and with gusto if we want the sector to live up to the current hype and achieve its hoped for and much-lauded transformative impact.

So what is the tagline to be? Well, the guy who runs our social enterprise on a day-to-day basis, can often be heard telling bemused teenagers who are being encouraged to become part of the CIC membership: “We’re like a charity only we earn our own money.” It is a simple sentence that conveys both our social motivation, and our commercial approach.

To read more pieces from our Secret Social Entrepreneur, click here. To write for the column, email Joe Jervis

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional. To join the social enterprise network, click here.

Tunisia and Egypt need the Arab revolutions to spread | Seumas Milne

Category : Business

Conflict over religion and identity risks diverting attention from the battle for social justice and national independence

From the first eruption of the Arab revolutions in Tunisia, it was clear that powerful forces would do everything possible to make sure they were brought to heel, or failed. Those included domestic interests which had lost out from the overthrow of the old regimes, Gulf states that feared the contagion would spread to their shores and western powers that had lost strategic clients – and didn’t like the idea of losing any more.

So after Tunisia and Egypt had fallen in quick succession, later uprisings were hijacked, as in Libya, or crushed, as in Bahrain, while sectarian toxins were pumped throughout the region, escalating the bloodshed in Syria in particular, and cash was poured into destabilising or co-opting the post-revolutionary states.

It seemed only Tunisia was small and homogenous enough to be spared a full-scale counter-revolutionary onslaught, its newly elected Islamist leaders pluralist enough to lead a successful democratisation and offer a progressive model for the rest of the region.

That was until the assassination of the leftist leader Chokri Belaïd in February brought to a head a rising tide of conflict between secular groups and Islamists (punctuated with a few violent incidents involving extreme Salafists). Whoever ordered the killing, which provoked large-scale protests, riots and demands for the dissolution of parliament and the overthrow of the government, was clearly out to destabilise the country.

Two months on, and Tunis has just hosted tens of thousands of international activists for the World Social Forum, first launched in Brazil 12 years ago to challenge corporate globalisation, with the aim of supporting radical change in North Africa and across the world.

For all the reports of insecurity, they found a city now strikingly calm and unthreatening, with Salafist fundamentalists thin on the ground and vibrant networks of social movements, trade unionism and protest campaigns. But the crisis of unemployment and poverty that sparked the Tunisian uprising is now worse than in 2010, and corruption in the police and bureaucracy remains dire.

Meanwhile, politics has become increasingly polarised around a dysfunctional standoff over religion and secularism: between the centrist Islamist Ennahda party – which was the main target for violent repression under Ben Ali’s dictatorship and won the 2011 elections – and opposition parties, both right and left, which accuse Ennahda of

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Birst Named SIIA Software CODiE Award Finalist for Best Business Intelligence/Analytics Solution

Category : World News

Leader in Cloud BI Earns Prestigious Software Industry Recognition

See original here: Birst Named SIIA Software CODiE Award Finalist for Best Business Intelligence/Analytics Solution

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NanoTech Entertainment, Inc. (NTEK: OTC Pink Current) | NanoTech Entertainment (NTEK) Announces North American Gaming Partner

Category : Stocks

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NanoTech Entertainment (NTEK) Announces North American Gaming Partner

Fun Company named Exclusive Manufacturing Partner

PR Newswire

LAS VEGAS, March 22, 2013

LAS VEGAS, March 22, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — NANOTECH ENTERTAINMENT (OTCPINK: NTEK) today announced from the Amusement Expo 2013 that it has reached an exclusive agreement with Fun Company to manufacture its line of coin-op and gaming products.

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NanoTech Entertainment, Inc. (NTEK: OTC Pink Current) | NanoTech Entertainment (NTEK) Announces North American Gaming Partner

Category : Stocks, World News

< ?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

NanoTech Entertainment (NTEK) Announces North American Gaming Partner

Fun Company named Exclusive Manufacturing Partner

PR Newswire

LAS VEGAS, March 22, 2013

LAS VEGAS, March 22, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — NANOTECH ENTERTAINMENT (OTCPINK: NTEK) today announced from the Amusement Expo 2013 that it has reached an exclusive agreement with Fun Company to manufacture its line of coin-op and gaming products.

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Host Analytics Appoints Lance Walter as CMO

Category : Stocks

Enterprise Software Veteran Joins Cloud Enterprise Performance Management Leader

Read more from the original source: Host Analytics Appoints Lance Walter as CMO

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