PennyStockPayCheck.com Rss

Featured Posts

Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

Read more

Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

Read more

Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

Read more

Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

Read more

UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

Read more

Stocks: Economy data could set tone

Category : Stocks

Investors have a lot to chew on Thursday as new data is released for inflation, housing, jobless claims and consumer sentiment.

Read more: Stocks: Economy data could set tone

Post to Twitter

Strategist predicts end of Bitcoin

Category : Business

Bitcoin is getting a lot of attention right now. But someone will eventually build a better virtual currency, says global risk strategist Ian Bremmer.

See the original post here: Strategist predicts end of Bitcoin

Post to Twitter

128 years of the Dow – what’s in and what’s out

Category : Business

The Dow has changed a lot in 128 years. See exactly how.

Read more from the original source: 128 years of the Dow – what’s in and what’s out

Post to Twitter

Margaret Thatcher wanted to crush the miners. That’s all she wanted

Category : Business

Ken Radford, a former miner who was at the Battle of Orgreave, talks to Ann Czernik about how Margaret Thatcher’s funeral will not heal the wounds his family still feels from her policies

In 1984, Ken Radford was a young man who did not want much – just “a decent wage, food on the table, and a better standard of living” for his family and community in Oughton, South Yorkshire. Like his mates, and thousands of other miners across the country, he worried what would happen if the pits closed, and was drawn into a class war.

“Thatcher wanted to crush the miners. That was her goal, that’s all she wanted,” says Ken.

Thirty years on, this is the first time he’s spoken in depth about the strike. Ken and others like him never talk about it. It’s too hard, too painful, too raw still. “A lot of people talk in beer and they go home and sleep it off next morning,” Ken says.

For Ken, Orgreave brings back mixed emotions. He made good friends, good memories; he shook Arthur Scargill’s hand. But he says: “What them bastards did to us, it goes deep, lass. It really goes deep.”

During the strike, police put Ken’s village under surveillance. Men and women were regularly stopped from travelling and police boarded public transport, buses, stopping cars and vehicles going to power plants, coking and steel works. On 18 June 1984 police were directing the miners into Orgreave with smiles on their faces.

“That day at Orgreave was planned,” says Ken. “They guided the lads in, telling us ‘that’s where you go lads, go into that field there’. We didn’t realise at the time what was going to happen but we found out. They gave us shit. You’ve seen the pictures: lads in T-shirts. It was frightening.

“They cordoned us off, there were more police than normal and they were just going to town. They blocked off the gates down at the bottom. All of a sudden they were banging their shields and we knew what was coming. They were animals. I had a lot of respect for the police before but that day I could have killed them. They murdered us.”

Ken carried his haemophiliac father-in-law across the field to prevent him bleeding to death. “There was a war, the ranks just opened up, horses came and they just charged. I don’t know how many were injured, there were a lot of lads just covered in blood. It looked like a battlefield.”

But Ken remembers a better time. His wife stood by him, battling on the street. There was a sense of community, of cohesion. “There were more people together, people speaking.” They called him Red Ken and the name stuck for a few years. He wanted something done to save his community from poverty.

Today, he says the area wants flattening. His wife works at Meadowhall, the cavernous shopping centre between Sheffield and Rotherham built, ironically, on a former steel plant. Ken laughs: “That makes sense doesn’t it: knock down a rolling mill and build a shopping centre.”

He says of the traumatised landscape: “We need jobs and industry. There is always spare land round here. Every time I go to me mam’s, I go past pit head. It hurts. My kids have never seen a pit head. I keep saying I’m going to take them to Wakefield to the mining museum but I can’t do it.”

Ken has two daughters, one son and four grandchildren. He’s seen his lad, now 25, defeated by lack of work and opportunity since being laid off by a local engineering firm five years ago. Ken shakes his head . The social stopped his money because “they said he wasn’t proving he was looking for work – he’s been looking for years.”

His eldest daughter works for her sister-in law’s debt recovery business. His other daughter – on her own with two children since her husband left – works behind a bar.

During the strike, Ken was the poorest he’d ever been, but still remembers it being one of the best Christmases ever: “My wife got a fur coat out of it. I had a pair of real Italian leather shoes.” Help came from all over – often from unlikely sources. And half the time, miners couldn’t understand the descriptions on food on packets or the games that well-wishers sent.

Every child of striking families went to school in a parka because a factory sent a job lot. The fur coat came in handy when Ken was cutting up cloth and anything else he could find to keep his family warm. Now, he asks himself if it was worth it. “There’s times I start doubting, and I think ‘no, I took a stand’”. He clenches his fist. “It’s killing me that there are still people round here who say ‘Our lad hasn’t got a job. I don’t know what he’s going to do when I go’ – I say fight.”

Thirty years on, Ken says the hope, heart – and jobs – in this once-thriving community have gone, and the pubs are empty. “People would pop in after work. Late shift finished at 10pm – straight in for the last couple of pints. Days, you’d pop in for a couple of pints. It was a lad thing, we were just all lads. It were brilliant … That’s gone. Thatcher and her kind, they took it all away.”

The ‘advanced manufacturing plant’ on the site of the former coking plant will only provide a fraction of the number of old jobs and are predominantly highly skilled, postgraduate positions. Around the site, dozens of private, executive-style homes are being built in readiness – a million miles away from the high density, social housing and type of employment skills available in traditional mining villages.

As for Thatcher’s legacy, Ken says: “My lad’s out of work. He’s 25, he’s had three, maybe four years’ work in the past nine years. He’s a good lad. Thatcher destroyed him through no fault of his own … Thatcher took everything away – hope, everything – just for her own pride.”

Top tips for growing your business

Category : Business

Last week a panel of experts advised readers on how to expand their small businesses. Here are the best bits from our live Q&A

Jemma Wilson, founder of Crumbs and Doilies, a cupcake baking business which launched in 2006

Sourcing supplies at wholesale prices: Finding wholesale suppliers can be difficult. Some wholesalers are a little bit stuck in the past (I have one supplier who still supplies the catalogue on a CD-rom). Also, you would be surprised how much price can vary between companies supplying similar products. Make sure you get a few prices before choosing a supplier and try and use as few suppliers as possible. This will cut down on delivery charges and staggered supplies. It’ll probably cut carbon emissions too.
Use the phone to get in touch with potential suppliers. In my experience I have received the best service when dealing with a real person. You can build up a relationship with your supplier which can help down the line with cost cutting and problems.

Personalising packaging: There are lots of things you can do to regular stock packaging to make it yours. Stickers are a perfect example. We now have all of our packaging custom-made, but in the early days and until not so long ago, we used boxes and other types of packaging that were held in stock with our suppliers and we simply pasted our flyers or stickers on to them. Sounds ropey but it actually looked really great. Getting custom packaging made can be incredibly expensive so make sure you shop around for the best prices.

Andy Lopata, expert on networking strategy the author of three books on networking

Getting the word out: The golden rule with all social networks is to ‘engage rather than broadcast’. People don’t want to be sold to on social networks. They want you to listen to them, share useful information and get to know you. Frustratingly, this takes time but you sow the seeds to reap the rewards over time. Use Twitter or Facebook to get know your audience and position yourself as an expert and resource for your potential clients and the people who influence them.

James Gill, partner at The Pen Company, a family business which sells upmarket stationery

Ensuring good cashflow: A potentially sound and successful business can fail due to poor cashflow management. For someone starting out I would recommend:

• Get hold of an accounting package. Your accountant will probably have a favourite that he or she likes to work with and will recommend.

• Enter all of your invoices, payments and income regularly – once a week is good. Reconcile your bank statement as soon as it arrives. This way you will know exactly how you stand and will be able to see your commitments at least one month ahead. Estimate future income realistically.

• Negotiate with your suppliers: once you have a relationship with them, many suppliers will give extended terms to customers they trust. They may also be prepared to supply in smaller volume more regularly if you ask, although you will incur more delivery charges.

• Be realistic: don’t assume things will automatically go well, just because you want them to.

• If you see a problem looming, confront it. Contact the other parties that may be affected and explain the situation, what you are doing about it and ask for their co-operation. Knowledge is power and the more information you have the better decisions you will make and the more accurate your planning will be. Keep on top of the stats.

Simon Calderbank, client director for Acquire New Business

Recognising the importance of your brand: Branding is so much more than a logo. Your brand is the emotional reaction someone has when they say your company name – it’s everything they think and feel about your organisation. Think of your brand as a symbolic representation of your company, from the way you deliver your service and the advice you give to the way you answer the phone. It’s the sum total of everything you do to interact with your customers, colleagues, suppliers and market.

Imran Merza, co-founder of Jealous Sweets

Knowing what help is available: Depending on the type of business there are a few options, such as the enterprise capital funds. They are government-backed venture capital funds that aim to invest in fast-growing small businesses. I think getting a business mentor is probably the best way to move forward, someone who can give you tailored advice.

Alex Cohen, founder of Xander Marketing with more than a decade of experience in the field

Recognising the best marketing channels: WIth any marketing channel it’s worth asking ‘What is the purpose?’ first. Just because other people are on Facebook or other businesses are on LinkedIn, it doesn’t necessarily mean you should be there. You could try going door to door? What about sending an email with a free white paper? Maybe send a gimmick through the post or advertise in a trade magazine? There are lots of options and sometimes with marketing it’s a case of trying a few and seeing what sticks. I would try a few channels and see what works.

Annette Du Bois, co-founder of Smangel (Social Media Angel) and author of Big Profit Thinking To Stop Your Small Business Sinking

Having a good mix of strategies: The most important thing is to know who your customer is and what you’re really selling to help you maximise your efforts. Most of these are about sowing seeds to farm in the future. One of the gems that a lot of business owners miss is in the ‘follow up’ process, think of it as relationship marketing that continues to build the trust and credibility to make it easier for people to buy from you.

Gillian Harris, managing director of Gilliangladrag

Working with freelances: I employ quite a lot of freelances and tutors at the shop. Always make sure it’s kept business-like. They are indeed your employee, as you are paying their wages, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be friendly. It’s just important to establish the working relationship from the offset – to make sure they are working for you in the way you want them to.

Taking on employees: Sometimes it’s really difficult to let go and not be a control freak. But unless you can give your employees a degree of responsibility they won’t work to their potential. So sometimes it pays off to let go of things you really shouldn’t be doing. This allows you to move forward yourself and expand your business.

It is risky taking on employees – and all the associated hassles that that brings. But sometimes companies can’t move forward until they do. The most important thing is to find the right people, so keep looking until you do.

It’s worrying to think that your employees might run off with your customers and go and do their own thing, but you need to remain confident in what you do, and try and find staff who just want a job and aren’t entrepreneurial themselves. It’s just a question of advertising and interviewing until you find the right person.

Click here to read the full Q&A

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional. To receive more like this you can become a member of the Small Business Network here.

Stocks: Earnings, economy in focus after sell-off

Category : Business, Stocks

Investors will have a lot to consider Tuesday with a full slate of corporate results and economic reports on tap and markets may be jittery after selling accelerated Monday on news of the Boston marathon attack.

See the original post: Stocks: Earnings, economy in focus after sell-off

Post to Twitter

Quality stocks may not have peaked yet

Category : Stocks

Opinion: Some stocks trading near their highs are way too risky. But it’s a mistake to declare that every stock that is up a lot must be overvalued simply because it has gone up a lot.

Go here to see the original: Quality stocks may not have peaked yet

Post to Twitter

Cyprus: panic as savings levy is imposed

Category : Business

Cypriots rush to ATMs before savings are docked as part of a bailout deal agreed in Brussels

Cypriots reacted with shock that turned to panic on Saturday after a 10% one-off levy on savings was forced on them as part of an extraordinary 10bn euro (£8.7bn) bailout agreed in Brussels.

People rushed to banks and queued at cash machines that refused to release cash as resentment quickly set in. The savers, half of whom are thought to be non-resident Russians, will raise almost €6bn thanks to a deal reached by European partners and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). It is the first time a bailout has included such a measure and Cyprus is the fifth country after Greece, the Republic of Ireland, Portugal and Spain to turn to the eurozone for financial help during the region’s debt crisis. The move in the eurozone’s third smallest economy could have repercussions for financially overstretched bigger economies such as Spain and Italy.

People with less than 100,000 euros in their accounts will have to pay a one-time tax of 6.75%, Eurozone officials said, while those with greater sums will lose 9.9%. Without a rescue, president Nicos Anastasiades said Cyprus would default and threaten to unravel investor confidence in the eurozone. The Cypriot leader, who was elected last month on a promise to tackle the country’s debt crisis, will make a statement to the nation on Sunday.

The prospect of savings being so savagely docked sparked terror among the island’s resident British community. At the Anglican Church’s weekly Saturday thrift shop gathering in Nicosia, Cyprus’s war-divided capital, ex-pats expressed alarm with many saying that they had also rushed to ATMs to withdraw money from their accounts. “There’s a run on banks. A lot of us are really panicking. The big fear is that there soon won’t be cash in ATMs,” said Arlene Skillett, a resident in Nicosia. “People are worried that they’re automatically going to lose ten present [of their savings] in deposit accounts. Anastasiades won elections saying he wouldn’t allow this to happen.”

She said a lot of elderly Britons had transferred savings to the island when they had decided to retire there. “Nobody can understand how they can do this – isn’t it illegal? How can they just dock money from your account?” she asked.

In the coastal town of Larnaca, Cypriots described how they had queued from the early hours in the hope of withdrawing deposits from banks. “A lot of us just can’t believe it,” said Alexandra Christofi, a divorcee in her 40s who said she had rushed to her bank before doors even opened at 6am. “I had put my money there for a rainy day. It’s absolutely all I have and I cannot understand how Cyprus is being singled out. Other EU countries got bailouts and we’re only in this position because we supported Greece,” she said, referring to the massive losses the Cypriot banking system suffered as a result of Greece’s restructuring its debt last year. “Where is the fairness in that? Where is the solidarity and support that is meant to be the reason why we are all unified in this common currency in the first place?”

Maria Zembyla, from Nicosia, said the levy would make a “big dent” in her family’s savings and “erode the investor confidence”. “It is robbery. People like us have been working for years, saving to pay for our children’s studies and pensions and suddenly they steal a big share of this money. Russians that currently keep the economy afloat will leave the country along with their money,” she added.

Howard Skelton, in Limassol, said: “The only people who will benefit in the long term are the banks. It will be many years before the man in the street begins to feel any benefit from this bailout. The sooner I can return to the UK the better.”

The levy does not take effect until Tuesday, following a public holiday, but action is being taken to control electronic money transfers over the weekend. Co-operative banks, the only ones open in Cyprus on a Saturday, closed following a run on the credit societies while ATMs cancelled transactions due to “technical issues”.

“I wish I was not the minister to do this,” Cypriot finance minister Michael Sarris said after Friday’s late-night talks in Brussels. “Much more money could have been lost in a bankruptcy of the banking system or indeed of the country.”

Depositors started queuing early to withdraw their cash, and protestors gathered outside the presidential palace. “I’m extremely angry. I worked years and years to get it together and now I am losing it on the say-so of the Dutch and the Germans,” said British-Cypriot Andy Georgiou, 54, who returned to Cyprus in mid-2012 with his savings.

“They call Sicily the island of the mafia. It’s not Sicily, it’s Cyprus. This is theft, pure and simple,” said a pensioner.

IMF managing director Christine Lagarde, who attended the meeting, said she backed the deal and would ask her board in Washington to contribute to the bailout. “We believe the proposal is sustainable for the Cyprus economy,” she said, “The IMF is considering proposing a contribution to the financing of the package. The exact amount is not yet specified.”

Nominate Website for Page1 Online Marketing’s ‘Worst Website in America’ Contest

Category : Stocks

FORT COLLINS, CO–(Marketwire – Mar 15, 2013) – Do you know of a business with a website that could use a little improvement? Or maybe a lot of improvement? Page1 Online Marketing, a web design and internet marketing company based in Fort Collins, Colorado, wants to help eliminate bad websites across America. That’s why their team of expert web designers is announcing a competition to find the business with the ‘Worst Website in America’. The winner will receive a free website redesign to take their website from being a drag to being the pride of their business.

Here is the original post: Nominate Website for Page1 Online Marketing’s ‘Worst Website in America’ Contest

Post to Twitter

Row over Amazon ‘rape’ T-shirt

Category : Business, World News

Internet retailer Amazon is continuing to list clothes from a US firm despite a row over a T-shirt with the slogan “keep calm and rape a lot”.

Continue reading here: Row over Amazon ‘rape’ T-shirt

Post to Twitter