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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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Letters: Why Milton is not spinning in his grave over press regulation

Category : Business

Your editorial (No cause for hyperventilating, 18 March) doubts that “John Milton will be spinning in his grave” over current rows about press freedom. Of course he isn’t: he was Cromwell’s censor. In the Areopagitica, the great phrase is “as good almost kill a man as kill a good book”. The crucial adjective is “good”, and he was quite happy to determine what could be so described and burn the rest.

The turning corpse we should be worrying about is Sir Roger L’Estrange, the last statutory censor of the press – “Surveyor of the Imprimie”. He must be cheering. A fervent royalist, L’Estrange believed “it is the Press that has made ‘um Mad, and the Press must set ‘um Right again” and was therefore also licensed to be a monopolistic news publisher. So, if we are turning back the clock, how long before we do it properly and appoint Rupert Murdoch (or his front-person) by royal charter “Surveyor of the Media”?
Brian Winston
University of Lincoln

• Implementing the Leveson proposals is not an issue of whether we have a “free” or a “shackled” press. The papers that are complaining are privately owned, and the notion that they are edited without any influence from the companies that own them is for the birds. Nor is there any proposal to shackle them: it is simply to do what self-regulation has repeatedly failed to do and set out a framework that will require them to behave responsibly.

Claims that the terms proposed would have prevented the Daily Mail’s challenge to those it accused of Stephen Lawrence’s murder, or the Daily Telegraph’s exposé of the expenses scandal are disingenuous: neither would have been realistically threatened. On the other hand, the Sun might well have taken the trouble to investigate its assertions about the victims of the Hillsborough disaster more carefully.
Ian Roberts
Baildon, West Yorkshire

• Those of us who watched the Leveson inquiry day after day were satisfied when the politicians admitted that they had been too close to the owners and editors of newspapers. It was agreed there would have to be changes. Then, after the publication of the inquiry report, one of the most open examinations of public life, politicians and the newspapers went private. Both having been found guilty, they were left to decide away from the public gaze what part of the sentence suited them.
John Grist
Richmond

• Why all this talk about newspapers opting into regulation or failing to opt in (Newspaper groups threaten boycott if Tories back down over press regulator, 18 March)? We can’t opt out of regulations about how we drive our motor cars just because we think we ought to be able to drive faster or reckon it costs too much to insure them.
Kevin McGrath
Harlow

• May I thank the Lib Dems for standing firm and sticking to principle to help force David Cameron to do what is right for once, rather than what is politically expedient for the Conservatives and their puppet masters?
Michael Miller
Sheffield

Buyer Group International, Inc. (BYRG: OTC Pink Current) | Buyer Group International, Inc. (BYRG.PK) to Release Drill Program Reports For Wyoming

Category : Stocks

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Buyer Group International, Inc. (BYRG.PK) to Release Drill Program Reports For Wyoming

PR Newswire

AUSTIN, Texas, March 18, 2013

AUSTIN, Texas, March 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ –

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Northern Vertex Mining Corp. (NHVCF: OTC Link) | Northern Vertex Announces Results From First 33 Holes of 10,000 Meter Drill and Resource Definition Program at Lemhi Gold Project, Idaho

Category : World News

October 19, 2012

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Porn block plan consultation ends

Category : Business, World News

A public consultation into whether UK internet users must be forced opt-in in order to access pornography is to end on Thursday.

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Atlanta Gold Inc. (ATLDF: OTC Link) | ATLANTA GOLD ANNOUNCES 54% INCREASE IN INDICATED GOLD EQUIVALENT RESOURCE AT ITS ATLANTA PROPERTY IN IDAHO

Category : Stocks

NEWS RELEASE

July 21, 2011

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Canamex Resources Corp. (CNMXF: OTC Link) | Canamex Announces Channel Sampling Results at the Bruner Gold-Silver Project, Nye County, Nevada

Category : World News

CANAMEX RESOURCES CORP.< ?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

Suite 303, 595 Howe Street

Vancouver, B.C. V5C 2T5

Phone (604) 718-2800

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Ofcom wants mobile phone bills to contain fewer surprises

Category : Business

The telecoms regulator wants customers to be able to set limits on their spending and to be alerted about usage

Mobile phone customers will be allowed to set their own limits on how much they spend, under measures set out by Ofcom.

In a review of surprisingly high bills, the telecommunications regulator found that mobile customers were most likely to be affected: as many as 1.4m mobile phone contract customers may have suffered unexpectedly high bills in the past six months.

The main causes of high bills include downloading data, primarily when the customer is travelling outside the EU, exceeding inclusive allowances or calling numbers not included in those allowances, or when a phone is lost or stolen and used by someone else.

If a phone is stolen and thieves run up a huge bill, the consumer can be liable for the full amount, even if it runs into thousands of pounds. But Ofcom says it wants to “explore the feasibility of limiting the amount consumers would be liable for if their phone was stolen”. It is urging providers to advertise more clearly the steps that consumers can take to protect themselves, such as locking their phone.

The telecoms regulator has also called on mobile providers to help customers control the amount they spend, including the development of “opt in” measures, such as tariffs that allow customers to set their own financial caps and allow them to receive alerts about usage. It also plans further research to see if “opt out” measures would work better for consumers.

If phone providers fail to do enough to help consumers, Ofcom “may consider mandatory options to tackle the problem”.

Marzena Lipman, digital policy manager at Consumer Focus said: “Massive mobile bills when people return from trips abroad are the last thing they need. The next logical stage would be to also protect mobile phone customers in the UK. Consumers travelling in Europe are protected from unexpectedly high bills with a €50 (£42) cut-off limit, and consumers in the UK should be entitled to similar levels of protection.

“While some customers may want a higher data allowance, an opt-out default cut-off limit could help end bill-shocks in the UK.”

Ernest Doku, telecoms expert at uSwitch.com, welcomed the move to educate consumers more about the costs of using their phone: “Consumers are still being stung with unexpected high charges and, whilst the onus is on the consumer to discuss options with their provider or switch to a package that more suits their usage, there is still an overriding responsibility on providers to look into measures to educate and combat the issue.

“A survey of mobile phone users carried out by uSwitch.com revealed that only a fifth of Brits check how much they’ll be charged for using their phones abroad before they go, and four in ten have no idea of the costs.”

Sky Poker Introduces Priority Membership

Category : World News

Regular players can now opt in to take advantage of a range of exclusive benefits.

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Sky Poker Introduces Priority Membership

Category : World News

Regular players can now opt in to take advantage of a range of exclusive benefits.

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