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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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Girls ‘hit hard by world recession’

Category : Business, World News

A shrinking world economy is painful for many, but girls and women suffer most from the effects of recession.

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Latest college cost hikes modest, but still bite – CBS News

Category : Stocks

Latest college cost hikes modest, but still bite
CBS News
The sticker price of in-state tuition at four-year public universities climbed about $400 this fall, an increase of nearly 5 percent that brought the average to $8,655. That's a modest increase compared to recent years, but still painful for families with stagnant

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You Can Let Your Guard Down: Ask Noah

Category : Business

The following commentary comes from an independent investor or market observer as part of TheStreet’s guest contributor program, which is separate from the company’s news coverage.

NEW YORK (TheStreet) — Q: Whenever I am dating a woman, I always feel the need to be the one in control. I tend to be very guarded. Conversations seem to always be about my superficial stuff, then the relationship usually ends, and I never really form a solid connection. I have begun to date someone I really care for, and would love to see this pattern change. But I’m a little scared about being more open. Thanks for taking the time to help. There are real risks in trusting another enough to let your guard down.

A: There are real risks in trusting another enough to let your guard down, to let them see all facets of you and perhaps to even let them take care of you. What if they disappoint you? What if they can’t give you all you need? These are painful questions to explore. Asking will absolutely bring up unfamiliar and sometimes anxiety-provoking feelings. The key is to not let fear stop your progress or halt you from taking action. By writing to me, you have taken the first step to ensure this does not happen. …

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Sell Sirius XM on More of the Same

Category : Business, Stocks

NEW YORK (TheStreet) — Stock charts often tell profound and painful stories.

Consider the intraday mayhem in Sirius XM, as the chart from midday Tuesday shows, above, courtesy of Yahoo! Finance. …

Click to view a price quote on SIRI.

Click to research the Media industry.

Link: Sell Sirius XM on More of the Same

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When is Hot Water Too Hot?

Category : World News

The New York State Consumer Protection Board has issued a directive urging consumers to make sure their children and loved ones are protected from extremely painful and possibly fatal scalding burns.

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Euro crisis: of morality and bankers | Editorial

Category : Business

It’s a sign of how bad things have got in the euro crisis that a not-entirely terrible bond auction counts as good news

It’s a sign of how bad things have got in the euro crisis that a not-entirely terrible bond auction counts as good news. So it was , on Thursday when the Spanish government went to the financial markets to raise money for two-year and 10-year loans – and found takers for both. “Relief at demand for Spanish debt” ran one headline, which was a reasonable summary of market reaction. Yet hardly anyone thinks the panic has abated for more than a minute: not at all. For a start, the interest rate Madrid now has to pay on its 10-year loans has jumped, from 5.403% to 5.743%. This isn’t quite as steep as the 6% that Spanish IOUs were fetching this week, but the difference is obviously not great. According to Moody’s, borrowing costs above 5.7% “significantly raise the chance of default” for Mariano Rajoy’s government. If that’s right, then Europe’s fifth-largest economy – and the rest of the eurozone – is teetering on the brink of disaster.

That’s the trouble with this crisis: even the comparatively good news turns out to be deeply worrying. And the anxiety is hardly quelled by the responses from policy-makers. On the upside, this week’s IMF meeting has seen nations slowly but surely giving cash to boost the eurozone rescue fund. On the downside, very few serious investors have much confidence that the rescue fund will be especially effective in the event of Madrid needing a bailout. European officials point to Mr Rajoy’s resolve to make painful budget cuts; but all the evidence is that the spending squeeze is ruining the outlook for Spain’s economy and its unemployed (especially the 50% of under-25s out of work) – without convincing financiers that the country is a decent credit risk.

Speaking during this week’s London Book Fair, the Toulouse-based economist Paul Seabright deftly summed up why such huge, painful efforts simply aren’t paying off. Politicians, he said, remain hellbent on painting the euro crisis as a morality tale – a saga of profligate southern Europeans and virtuous northern Europeans – when it is anything but. Until the eve of the banking crisis, Spain had sounder public finances than Germany. Similarly, the idea that Athens was covering up the level of its debt only gets you so far. Anyone who cared to inspect the figures could see that by 2008 Greece had become the fifth-largest importer of arms in the world – behind China, India, the United Arab Emirates and South Korea, despite having a far smaller economy than any of those countries. As Mr Seabright put it, such information, denoting just how wildly Greece was spending on the wrong things, was “in plain view” of any supposedly cautious German banker who cared to look on the internet – the implication being that they couldn’t be bothered.

Arms dealers obviously do well out of such a relaxed approach to lending – but so do banks, at least during the good times. Which brings us to one of the most important yet under-remarked aspects of the euro meltdown. What has been painted as a battle between the virtuous, hardworking north and the lazy, feckless south should instead be depicted as a banking crisis. This is the crucial point made in a new paper published by Manchester’s centre for research on socio-cultural change. Called Deep Stall, it compares the eurozone collapse with a plane crash and finds one big difference: whereas everyone in the aviation industry – from passengers to planemakers to airlines – has a vested interest in keeping planes up in the air, the banks have no such commitment to keeping the rest of the financial system afloat as long as they get paid out.

The implication is clear: rather than devote efforts to ruining the lives of southern Europeans, a far more effective way to deal with the continent’s crisis would be to restructure the banks, then rein them in for good. The alternative is to trust in austerity for the public and generously allow the banks to “deleverage” and shrink their balance sheets at their own pace. This is exactly the policy that has turned a Greek tragedy into an existential threat to the entire euro.

San Jose Chiropractor Urges Car Accident Injury Victims to Seek Treatment

Category : World News

SAN JOSE, CA–(Marketwire – Apr 8, 2012) – Dr. Jennifer Forster, the chiropractor who runs Insight Chiropractic clinic in San Jose, advises car accident injury victims to get evaluated as soon as possible after an accident, even if it seemed to be a minor fender bender. According to Dr. Forster, even low-speed auto accidents can cause serious injuries such as whiplash. She explains that soft tissue injuries like this may not manifest symptoms of pain until hours, days or even weeks later. She stresses that prompt evaluation of car accident victims for any of these issues can help prevent painful conditions from appearing or worsening over time.

Original post: San Jose Chiropractor Urges Car Accident Injury Victims to Seek Treatment

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Who’s afraid of Greek credit default swaps?

Category : Stocks

For investors, the words credit default swap can bring back painful memories of 2008. But in the case of Greece, the dreaded derivatives may not be the ticking time bomb some have feared.

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Gas prices keep climbing

Category : Business, Stocks

Paying at the pump grew even more painful Saturday, as gas prices climbed for the 18th day in a row.

Originally posted here: Gas prices keep climbing

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Gas prices keep climbing

Category : Business

Paying at the pump grew even more painful Saturday, as gas prices climbed for the 18th day in a row.

See the rest here: Gas prices keep climbing

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