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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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HSBC may cut up to 14,000 more jobs

Category : Business

HSBC says it may cut an additional 14,000 jobs globally as part of its three-year restructuring plan to reduce costs.

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Jamie Dimon’s likely successor will not impress critics

Category : Business

JPMorgan Chase’s likely CEOs-in-waiting come from the part of the bank that makes regulators and investors most nervous.

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Youth unemployment in Europe – how is it affecting you?

Category : Business

The number of unemployed young people is at record levels across Europe, rising to over 50% in some countries. Share your experiences, frustrations, tips or success stories of finding work where you live.

Youth unemployment is one of the biggest problems facing the EU and it isn’t showing any signs of letting up. As of March 2013, 5.690 million young people (under 25) were unemployed in the wider EU area of 27 countries, with 3.599 million in the eurozone .

Greece has recorded an unemployment rate of 59.1% at the beginning of this year with Spain reporting 55.9%, Italy 38.4% and Portugal 38.3%.

We would like to hear your experiences of the job market in your country. Are you worried about finding a job after you leave training or education? Have you been successful in finding employment or have you been out of work for a long time? How has your life been affected due to a lack of employment opportunities? Do you have any tips on finding work you’d like to share?

Share your experiences and concerns by filling in the form below. A selection of the best responses will be posted on the site as part of a readers’ panel.

Judges to rule on tax deal with bank

Category : World News

The High Court is being asked to decide whether HM Revenue and Customs acted illegally by letting Goldman Sachs off part of its tax bill.

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Disciplined Growth Investors: Using Benjamin Graham’s Stock Valuation Formula

Category : Stocks, World News

Benjamin Graham and the Power of Growth Stocks, Part 2 in a Series

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REMINDER/Media Advisory: Commander Chris Hadfield Communicates Through Amateur Radio With Students from Whitehorse, Yukon

Category : Stocks, World News

LONGUEUIL, QUEBEC–(Marketwired – April 20, 2013) - As part of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Astronaut Chris Hadfield will answer questions live from the International Space Station.

Originally posted here: REMINDER/Media Advisory: Commander Chris Hadfield Communicates Through Amateur Radio With Students from Whitehorse, Yukon

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New Jersey Cosmetic Dentist Upgrades Software for One Visit Restorations

Category : World News

MILLBURN, NJ–(Marketwired – Apr 16, 2013) – Dr. Harold Pollack, a dentist in New Jersey, and his practice have updated their CEREC software and camera to maintain their commitment to providing the most advanced technology and procedures available. The CEREC device is designed to create custom dental restorations in one appointment so that patients can have their teeth fitted with a long-lasting solution on the same day. With statistics from the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) reporting that 69 percent of adults ages 35 to 44 have lost at least one permanent tooth, Dr. Pollack says providing the highest quality dental restorations and the latest technology is an essential part of his commitment to patient care.

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French ministers to reveal wealth

Category : Business, World News

French government ministers are due to reveal details of their personal wealth as part of efforts by President Hollande to regain public trust.

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Work doesn’t pay for multi-part-time employees

Category : Business

On paper the number of people in work has risen. But many of these jobs are part time, poorly paid and insecure

They’re the forgotten victims of Britain’s long recession. The individuals and families who have lost well-paid work, but figure only briefly in the unemployment figures as they patch together poorly paid part-time work while struggling to cope with a collapse in their living standards.

Sophie Gaskin worked for 13 years as a forensic scientist then, as a trainer, she taught government agencies and police forces how to gather valuable evidence. She was made redundant in October 2010, shortly before the government closed the Forensic Science Service after it ran up losses of £2m a month – a decision later condemned by the House of Commons science and technology committee for the impact it may have on the criminal justice system.

But for Sophie, it has been personally devastating. After specialising in a niche area, she has found it impossible to find work elsewhere using her scientific skills.

Her savings were initially too high to qualify for welfare benefits. “I couldn’t claim until I was down to the minimum £5,000. Then it took six months to get any money, by which time I was down to my last few pounds,” she says. She has, though, qualified for housing benefit on the flat she rents in Surrey.

This single, fortysomething, has only been able to find part-time admin work paying £8 an hour, and is desperately struggling to make ends meet. “There’s no possibility of going full time and, even if I could, I’d lose my housing benefit. On such a low wage I wouldn’t be able to pay the rent,” she says.

Gaskin has been helped by her union, Prospect, which has provided training and advice, as well as four days of paid work as a trainer.

However, that income resulted in the loss of jobseeker’s allowance.

She goes to the supermarket in the evenings, looking for sell-by date reductions. “I buy value brands and shop late to pick up cut-price food. I get fruit and vegetables from my mother and bake my own bread,” she says.

She’s resilient but is clearly saddened by the loss of her job: “I am upset that forensic evidence is being overlooked. That could lead to miscarriages of justice.”

Low-paid part-time work and self-employment have mushroomed in Britain since 2007 as laid-off workers battle to maintain their living standards. Many economists have been puzzled at the lower-than-expected levels of unemployment, given the scale of the fall in GDP since 2008.

The jobless total jumped from 1.6m in early 2008 to a peak of 2.7m in 2011, but has since dropped to 2.5m. Meanwhile, those in work has risen to a record high of 29.73m, a result of population growth and what the government hails as a dramatic increase in private-sector employment.

But the majority of the newly-created jobs are in the service sector, many part-time, poorly paid and insecure. Even for these, critics say, there is competition from an army of underemployed workers seeking longer hours. A recent poll conducted by IPSOS Mori found that 40% of people in work (and 65% of 18 to 24-year-olds) said they would take on more hours if they could.

A report from the Resolution Foundation on the “squeezed middle” found that low-to-middle-income workers account for 70% of the overall growth in self-employment. Increasing food inflation means families within this group have to pay a £280 cost of living “premium” as they spend a greater share of their budget on essentials (which have risen faster than other goods) compared with higher-income households.

Lower income households are also bearing the brunt of unavoidable increases in the cost of food and utilities, such as gas, electricity and water.

Andrea Kennedy, 48, a divorced mother of two in Liverpool, is typical of those surviving on casual contracts with no job security and sometimes weeks or even months without work.

Until two-and-a-half years ago she was just about managing to cope taking short-term, six-month and 12-month contracts as a full-time administrator. “It was financially hard work, as I was often out of work for up to a month between contracts,” she says.

After yet another contract ended prematurely, she has turned to cleaning to earn a full-time income. “Until recently I’ve been doing three or four part-time cleaning jobs on the minimum wage of £6.19 an hour in order to make ends meet. However, eight weeks ago my hours were cut as one company lost a contract. Now I only have 21 hours.”

Although she owns her two-bed house, she made the mistake of taking out a £15,000 secured loan on her home in 2006 and is still struggling to pay the debt, which has grown to £24,000. “My mortgage is £251 a month and £223 on the loan. At best, I’m only earning £775 a month and, because my working hours fluctuate, I can’t claim tax credits when they drop below 30 hours a week.”

She admits her standard of living has been hit hard. “I’ve had to sell my car, cut back on food and can’t afford a computer or phone. There are no nights out and a cup of coffee is the only treat I can afford.”

She is now considering moving out of Liverpool and gets by with the help of friends and Citizens Advice.

The Trussell Trust, a charity that operates food banks in the UK, says it is not just the homeless, or those living entirely on benefits, who are using its services, but also the working poor, whose incomes have plummeted.

“We’re opening three new foodbanks every week to try and help local communities meet the growing need for emergency food,” says its executive chairman Chris Mould. “People are often surprised that less than 5% of foodbank clients are homeless but many of the 300,000 people we’re helping are low-income working families.”

Moreover, many workers are also getting into debt. National Debtline is a free national telephone helpline for people with debt problems in England, Scotland and Wales. Its spokesperson, Paul Crayston, says: “Almost half of the 234,000 calls in 2012 were from people in employment.”

But there are some who, having gone through the trauma of losing their job and taking a cut from a relatively high income, are now happier.

Maisie Collin, 36, lives in London with her 18-month-old son and her fiancé. Before the recession she worked on a freelance basis in the youth and family care sector, with an income of around £55,000.

After the downturn she took a job as a director of a charity, earning £40,000. In 2011 it was dissolved and she was made redundant while pregnant.

Maisie was unemployed for 18 months, not claiming benefits. She re-mortgaged her flat and used the money to retrain as an Ofsted-registered childcare provider and turn her flat into a nursery. She now runs a daycare centre from home part time, paying two apprentices from a local college to help. She also does part-time life coaching and massage therapy, as well as voluntary work with young people and families. She estimates her new income at between £33,000 and £35,000.

“I’ve got no security, and I have to work really hard. But I love the variety. My lifestyle had to change: everything stopped – I’d eat out quite a lot before, but we couldn’t do that, so I ate differently. I reduced going out.

“It can really affect everything, from your lifestyle to your friendships and relationships with your family. I had to create my own work, and I do earn a lot less than I used to and have a child to support, but I am happier now.”

Cyprus to sell off gold reserves

Category : Business

Cyprus is to sell off much of its gold reserves in order to help finance part of its bailout.

Read the rest here: Cyprus to sell off gold reserves

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