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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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Tastemaker Delivers Decorating Without the Drama

Category : Stocks, World News

New Online Interior Design Service Makes Hiring a Professional Decorator Easy and Affordable for Everyone

Originally posted here: Tastemaker Delivers Decorating Without the Drama

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Global migrants: Which are the most wanted professions?

Category : Business, World News

Our interactive guide to professional global migration

Link: Global migrants: Which are the most wanted professions?

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Why Richard III’s final resting place matters | Lucy Worsley

Category : Business

I’m in favour of a spot of Plantagenet controversy over King Richard’s burial place. It’s good for popular history – and tourism

Who says the Wars of the Roses are over? Five hundred years since the Battle of Bosworth, the Yorkist side is turning in on itself, and the Richard III Society may have finally met its match in the Plantagenet Alliance.

The former, in association with the University of Leicester, kicked off last year’s stunning exhumation of Richard III’s body from a car park in Leicester, and Leicester is where it wants his final resting place to be. Now the latter, consisting of 15 living relatives of the king, say they are planning to use the law to insist he be buried in York instead. You might wonder what they’re all getting so worked up about – and this Richard III business certainly defies all logical explanation.

In strictly scientific terms, there was no point in digging him up. Archaeologists thought he was under the car park – and indeed he was. Historians thought he had curvature of the spine – and it looks like indeed he did.

It was the sensational and emotional impact of the discovery that mattered, and many professional archaeologists and historians – and indeed journalists – found that uncomfortable. Words like “trivialisation” and “stunt” were bandied about, especially after the Channel 4 documentary that dwelt as much on the players as the results.

The editor of History Today, Paul Lay, blames “the pernicious influence of the solipsistic celebrity genealogy series Who Do You Think You Are?” for a demand for history to which we can “relate”. Indeed, Plantagenet Alliance members are “relatives” of the king, no less. And no more, either. As he had no children, they can’t claim to be his descendants.

It’s easy to mock the people who straightforwardly project their present concerns on to the past. As a curator, I’ve met endless people who feel a “special connection” with Anne Boleyn, or Victorian prostitutes, or various other unlikely candidates.

It’s easy too, if you look back at the past, to draw connections between people’s barmy obsessions and their own age. The Victorians were very taken with the idea that Henry VIII might have had syphilis, a disease that was central to their own health fears. Today the most modish explanation of the king’s maladies is Kell’s disease. If Henry VIII belonged to the rare Kell positive blood group, he would have found difficulty in fathering more than one child with any Kell-negative woman. The theory matches his reproductive history; but it’s also the perfect solution to have arisen in our own age, when genetics appears to have all the answers.

So I do have some sympathy with the professional historians and archaeologists who roll their eyes at the enthusiasts who stomp around fields on Saturdays in unconvincing costumes, complete with modern eyewear, or cry at archaeological digs. But ultimately if you push me, I’m always going to be on the side of the tearful. There seems to me to be something admirable, indeed noble, about the people arguing over Richard III. They’re doers rather than naysayers, romantics rather than realists, people looking for meaning rather than numbness. And I do wonder what professional historians are beavering away for in their ivory towers, if not to have history become part of the common currency of life.

Of course, it’s fun to point out the inaccuracies or sensationalism or elisions of historical drama, or history designed for public consumption. In another sense, though, it’s self-defeating, because if you constantly deride the offerings of this whole industry that produces what the Americans call “public history”, its customers will slip away to football, or Facebook, and leave us all the poorer.

Even if emotion isn’t your thing, look at the money. Whoever gets the final tomb of Richard III will have a new and possibly profitable tourist attraction on their hands. So I’m all in favour of a spot of Plantagenet controversy. There’s only one thing worse for a subject than being talked about. It’s not being talked about.

Buy-to-let landlords’ buying spree will keep more families in rental trap

Category : Business

Rightmove predicts three-quarters of professional landlords will buy more homes in 2013, as MPs begin to look at the issue

Buy-to-let landlords will embark on a home buying spree in 2013 while young adults and families remain trapped in rental properties, according to a forecast by Britain’s biggest property website.

Three out of four professional landlords will buy more homes in 2013, while the number of “virgin landlords” looking to buy for the first time is running at the highest level for a year, the research from Rightmove found. Meanwhile, 53% of tenants say they are trapped in renting, wanting to buy a home but unable to afford to do so.

The research is published as a committee of MPs begins a formal investigation into the problems facing Britain’s “Generation Rent”. The Commons communities and local government committee will examine the potential need for rent controls, regulation of landlords and letting agents, and a revision to tenancy contracts.

Urgent action is needed to tackle rogue landlords and rip-off letting agent fees, according to the Local Government Association (LGA), which represents 370 councils across England and Wales. It found that tenants are being asked to pay as much as £500 in non-refundable administration fees to letting agents on top of the rent and deposit.

Tony Newman of the LGA will give evidence to the committee on Monday. Before his appearance, he said: “With the housing market stagnant and a shortage of mortgages available to help first-time buyers, people are increasingly turning to the private rented sector to find a home.

“For many people looking to rent, the up-front costs of a deposit and agency fees can be huge. We’ve heard stories of some letting agents charging hundreds of pounds just to carry out basic credit and reference checks.”

Bank lending to landlords fell sharply during the financial crisis but has surged in recent months, boosted by the funding for lending scheme designed to help small businesses and first time buyers. Interest rates on buy-to-let loans have tumbled – Skipton, Coventry and Birmingham Midshires all cut rates for landlords last month – and lending volumes are rising. In the last quarter of 2012, loans to landlords were up 8% to £4.2bn, with new entrants such as Interbay Commercial jostling to offer mortgages of up to £1m spread over 30 years.

Rising rents (yields average 5.7%) and low-cost mortgages (now below 4%) will spur small landlords to buy more properties in 2013, said Rightmove, even if the long-anticipated investment from institutions such as pension funds has failed to materialise.

Rightmove director Miles Shipside said: “While the cavalry charge from major institutions seeking to invest in the private rented sector has so far failed to materialise, private landlords, whether accidental, virgin or professional, are seizing the opportunities that come with having the battlefield to themselves.”

But campaigners at Priced Out, a group representing tenants unable to afford to buy, said without new building, landlords are simply displacing first-time buyers.

Letters: We must act now if the NHS is to be saved

Category : Business

Now that the Lib Dems have at last recovered an instinct for survival, if not adherence to principle (Clegg fears reprisals over Lib Dem stance on boundary vote, 30 January), is it too much to hope that self-interest at least will encourage them to support David Owen’s bill to restore the legal and democratic basis of the NHS (My plan to save the NHS, 29 January)? With Labour launching a health and social care policy review, the time has come for all interested parties, professional and patient groups, to work together to build a consensus aimed not only at stopping the worst excesses of the coalition’s market reforms, but at moving away from the wasteful purchaser-provider split and developing integrated health and social care services subject to democratic accountability and control. Proposals need to be ready for rapid enactment after the 2015 election to prevent further years of decline and demoralisation.
Dr Anthony Isaacs
London

• The article by David Owen makes many incorrect and damaging claims against the Health and Social Care Act. The duties of the health secretary, in place since the founding of the NHS, are absolutely reinforced by the act, and do not change the duty to promote a comprehensive health service. It simply makes clear that it is not the responsibility of ministers to provide or commission services directly; this is the job of frontline organisations, free from political micromanagement.

In fact, by setting out each organisation’s functions and responsibilities explicitly in legislation, the act clarifies and strengthens accountability: the secretary of state remains ultimately accountable to parliament for the health service, and will hold all national health bodies to account for achieving their objectives. Doctors, nurses and other health professionals will be able to do all the things that Owen’s bill seeks to do – including promoting and improving integration and co-operation throughout the health and care system – because the act gives them the power, the responsibility and the freedom to do so.
Frederick Howe
Health minister; House of Lords

• By the end of this week, the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, will have announced the future of Lewisham hospital. Lewisham is a popular, busy, well-managed, solvent district general hospital, whose fate hangs in the balance as part of a plan to bail out the separate South London Healthcare NHS Trust, which is bankrupt as a result of injudicious and unsustainable PFI debts.

Tens of thousands of patients and local people have signed petitions and marched in support of Lewisham. The local clinicians are opposed on clinical grounds to the proposed changes. There is no clinical rationale for the reconfiguration, and closure of Lewisham’s busy A&E and consultant-led maternity departments will potentially put patients at risk – a slick and expensive “consultation document” denigrating local services and clinicians notwithstanding. In other words, downgrading Lewisham is contrary to all of Mr Hunt’s previously stated criteria for service reconfiguration.

BMA London regional council, which

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Icron Technologies’ USB 3.0 Spectra(TM) 3022 Showcased by syscomtec Distribution at ISE 2013 in Amsterdam

Category : World News

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS–(Marketwire – Jan. 29, 2013) - Icron Technologies Corporation, a leader in USB and KVM extension technology, is pleased to announce that syscomtec Distribution AG, specialists in visualization technologies, signal management and control in the field of professional audio-visual media, is the first European distributor to carry Icron’s USB 3.0 SpectraT 3022 extender and will have it on display at Integrated Systems Europe (ISE) 2013 in Amsterdam, January 29-31.

Read the original: Icron Technologies’ USB 3.0 Spectra(TM) 3022 Showcased by syscomtec Distribution at ISE 2013 in Amsterdam

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Icron Technologies’ USB 3.0 Spectra(TM) 3022 Showcased by syscomtec Distribution at ISE 2013 in Amsterdam

Category : Stocks, World News

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS–(Marketwire – Jan. 29, 2013) - Icron Technologies Corporation, a leader in USB and KVM extension technology, is pleased to announce that syscomtec Distribution AG, specialists in visualization technologies, signal management and control in the field of professional audio-visual media, is the first European distributor to carry Icron’s USB 3.0 SpectraT 3022 extender and will have it on display at Integrated Systems Europe (ISE) 2013 in Amsterdam, January 29-31.

Read more here: Icron Technologies’ USB 3.0 Spectra(TM) 3022 Showcased by syscomtec Distribution at ISE 2013 in Amsterdam

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Opportunistic fraud ‘on the rise’

Category : Business

Personal pressures at work and at home are driving more people to commit fraud, while crime by professional fraudsters is falling, a survey suggests.

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MONTAGUE INTERNATIONAL HOLDING LTD. (MIHL: OTC Link) | MONTAGUE INTERNATIONAL HOLDING LTD. (MIHL) BOARD JOINED BY NEW DIRECTORS AND IN-HOUSE COUNSEL

Category : Stocks

MIHL had announced today that as of January 2, 2013, its Board of Directors had been expanded by an additional three members and that it had retained the services of in-house Corporate Counsel in addition to the outside legal representation it currently enjoys.< ?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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Altura Expands Professional Services Team and Reach

Category : Stocks

FULLERTON, CA–(Marketwire – Nov 30, 2012) – Altura Communication Solutions, a nationwide provider of communication enabled solutions and managed services, today announced the expansion to Altura’s suite of Professional Services to meet an increasing demand in the marketplace for consultative and ongoing managed services driven by complex, converged network technology. The Professional Services offerings now include: Network readiness, Network integration and implementation, Mobility solutions, Contact center optimization and consulting, Voice and Data convergence, and SIP enablement.

Continue reading here: Altura Expands Professional Services Team and Reach

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