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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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NISA told Tepco to delay reporting looming explosion

Category : World News

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency ordered Tepco in March 2011 to delay announcing that the pressure level in one of the Fukushima No. 1 plant’s wrecked reactors was spiking to critical levels, teleconference footage released by the utility shows.
Images of Tokyo Electric Power Co. teleconferences during the initial stages of the nuclear crisis, as well as other materials and information, confirm that Tepco was forced to defer an announcement after pressure inside the reactor 3 containment vessel suddenly spiked to alarming levels around 6 a.m. March 14.

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Residents ponder escape routes as restart begins

Category : World News

Hundreds of out-of-town protesters gathered Sunday evening at the Oi nuclear power plant in Fukui Prefecture in a last-ditch attempt to stop the reactivation of its No. 3 reactor.
The Oi plant is the first in the country to be reactivated after inspection since last year’s Fukushima nuclear crisis. All the nation’s commercial reactors have been offline since early May.

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Letters: The price is right to tackle climate change

Category : Business

George Monbiot mistakes short-term methods for long-term goals (Comment, 29 May). The coalition is fully committed to cleaning up our electricity supply and meeting our climate change targets – but it will take time. We have policies to support clean energy, reduce emissions and encourage energy-saving. But we need a diverse energy portfolio to keep the lights on while we develop low-carbon energy sources. Natural gas is part of that portfolio; it is cleaner than coal and can help smooth out unpredictable renewables, bolstering our energy security.

That is why the emissions performance standard is set at a level that prevents new coal being built, but allows investment in gas. It can be revised downward at any time; and the exemption for coal is not a loophole, but designed to encourage carbon capture and sequestration. The Committee on Climate Change says our approach “could be compatible with power sector decarbonisation required to meet carbon budgets” – provided we reform the electricity market to secure low-carbon investment. That is precisely what the reforms in the energy bill are designed to do: keep the lights on and the air clean at the lowest cost to the consumer.
Edward Davey MP
Secretary of state for energy and climate change

• Rumours that EDF has suspended plans for a reactor at Hinkley Point are the latest salvo in a brinkmanship exercise (Report, 28 May). The government has promised to subsidise new nuclear reactors by hiking up our energy bills; the more reluctant to build EDF appears to be, the more money ministers will offer. The cost of nuclear has soared to £7bn a reactor, while costs of renewable power continue to fall, but ministers are still clinging to their nuclear dream. By the time they wake up, we could have missed out on the chance to develop a competitive renewables industry and be left with a second “dash for gas”, at the expense of consumers’ wallets and the climate.
Richard George
Climate campaigner, Greenpeace UK

Land water flooding reactors to be diverted

Category : World News

Groundwater is seeping into the damaged reactor buildings at the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant, and Tokyo Electric Power Co. plans to build about a dozen wells to redirect and halve the flow.
Groundwater from precipitation is mixing with highly radioactive cooling water gathering in the reactor buildings, turbine buildings and basements, increasing the volume of tainted water at the complex.

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Another thermometer breaks at Fukushima

Category : World News

One of the two remaining thermometers at the bottom of the pressure vessel of reactor No. 2 at the Fukushima power plant is broken, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Sunday.
The finding follows the discovery of a broken thermometer in the same unit in February and means only 18 of its 36 temperature sensors are working, magnifying concerns about the utility’s long-term ability to monitor the crippled facility.

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Energy conservation is key

Category : World News

If all the reactors at Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Niigata Prefecture remain offline, and if approval is not given for restarting the Nos. 3 and 4 reactors at Kansai Electric Power Co.’s Oi nuclear power plant in Fukui Prefecture following their just-completed stress tests, Japan will enter the summer without any electricity being supplied from nuclear power plants.
That’s because the No. 3 reactor at Hokkaido Electric Power Co.’s Tomari nuclear power plant in Hokkaido, which is currently Japan’s only operating nuclear power plant, will stop operating in May for regularly scheduled inspection.

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NISA OKs Ikata reactor stress test

Category : World News

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said Monday it has endorsed stress test results on an idled reactor at Shikoku Electric Power Co.’s Ikata power plant, making it the third reactor to have cleared a key step for resuming operation.
NISA said it submitted a report validating the test results on reactor 3 of the plant in Ehime Prefecture to the Nuclear Safety Commission to have the adequacy of the agency’s evaluation checked.

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Noda’s definition of ‘safe’ questioned

Category : World News

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda assured the nation in December that the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant crisis had been reined in, but as the true extent of the damage inside the crippled reactors remains unknown a year on and with the complex still appearing vulnerable to another major quake, the government and Tepco’s claims that the facility is secure are being questioned.
Reactor engineers and seismologists believe another nightmare meltdown scenario is unlikely, but say the government and Tokyo Electric Power Co. still face massive obstacles and a host of challenges in decommissioning the plant, including decontaminating the wrecked reactor buildings and plugging cracked containment vessels. Even then, scrapping the plant conceivably could take more than 30 years.

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Security Council Resumes Iran Nuke Talks – TIME

Category : Stocks


CBC.ca
Security Council Resumes Iran Nuke Talks
TIME
By AP / ALI AKBAR DAREINI Tuesday, Mar. 06, 2012 A handout picture released by Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's official website shows him (R) listening to an expert during a tour of Tehran's research reactor on Feb. 15, 2012 .
World powers agree Iran nuclear talks can resumeCBS News
Hopes for Iran talks push oil price downFinancial Times
Iran must 'seize opportunity' for nuclear talks, says Britain's HagueNational Post
The Guardian

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An Israeli strike on Iran would backfire

Category : World News

On June 7, 1981, eight Israeli F-16 fighter jets, protected by six F-15 escorts, dropped 16 907-kg bombs on the nearly completed Osirak nuclear reactor at the Tuwaitha complex in Iraq. Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Defense Minister Ariel Sharon saw the reactor as central to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s quest to build nuclear weapons, and they believed that it posed an existential threat to Israel.
The timing of the strike was justified by intelligence reports suggesting that Osirak would soon become operational. Two days later, Begin explained the raid to the public: “We chose this moment: now, not later, because later may be too late, perhaps forever. And if we stood by idly, two, three years, at the most four years, and Hussein Hussein would have produced his three, four, five bombs … another Holocaust would have happened in the history of the Jewish people.”

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