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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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alice + olivia and ImagineX Partner for Greater China Expansion

Category : World News

NEW YORK, NY and HONG KONG–(Marketwired – May 15, 2013) – New York-based fashion brand alice + olivia by Stacey Bendet and Asia’s leading retail, brand management and distribution company ImagineX Group announced today an exclusive strategic partnership to develop the brand in Greater China and Southeast Asia through the opening of 23 points of sale over the next five years.

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NextTruckOnline.com’s Cost per Lead Program Offers an Alternative Sales Approach

Category : Stocks, World News

CROSSVILLE, TN–(Marketwired – May 10, 2013) – Cost per Lead: List for free, pay for results with NextTruck. Crossville, Tennessee-based NextTruckOnline.com has announced an exciting alternative to standard truck and trailer classified advertisements with their new cost per lead program. NextTruck has been a leader in the truck and trailer marketplace for several years, and has established a base of hundreds of advertisers who offer thousands of products for sale. The standard practice in the vehicle resale market is for a listing service to charge a monthly listing fee, whether the item has received offers or not. This may be the right choice for some, but an exciting alternative is the new cost per lead program — list for free, pay for results!

Continue reading here: NextTruckOnline.com’s Cost per Lead Program Offers an Alternative Sales Approach

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Apple taps markets for record $17bn

Category : World News

Apple raises $17bn (£10.9bn) via a bond sale, the biggest ever by a non-banking company, to help fund its plan for extra payouts to shareholders.

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Lloyds’ Co-op deal falls through

Category : World News

The planned sale of 632 UK bank branches by Lloyds Banking Group to the Co-op group falls through.

Original post: Lloyds’ Co-op deal falls through

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Lloyds’ Co-op deal falls through

Category : Business

The planned sale of 632 UK bank branches by Lloyds Banking Group to the Co-op group falls through.

Link: Lloyds’ Co-op deal falls through

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Profits up 16% at General Electric

Category : World News

General Electric reports a 16% rise in first quarter profits, helped by a one-off gain from the sale of its remaining stake in NBC Universal.

Originally posted here: Profits up 16% at General Electric

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Quick house sale firms spark OFT investigation

Category : Business

Watchdog says such firms provide useful service for homeowners but are often used by consumers in vulnerable situations

Companies who offer desperate homeowners a quick sale are to be investigated by the Office of Fair Trading, following concerns that their customers may be receiving tens of thousands of pounds less than their property is worth.

Quick house sale providers offer to buy a house or find a third party buyer very quickly, usually at a discount from the full market value. The sale is a cash sale, and the emphasis is on speed, with promises of completion in as little as five days in some cases. While most firms claim to offer fair or “realistic” prices and “no hidden fees”, consumers have reported cases where a price has been agreed, only to be dropped at the last minute, and being hit with high charges after a valuation has been accepted.

The OFT has launched a market study into the industry, writing to more than 50 quick house sale firms asking for information on their business models and calling for consumers who have used these services to tell it about their experiences.Cavendish Elithorn, the OFT’s senior director for goods and consumer, said: “Businesses offering quick house sales may provide a useful service for homeowners who need to unlock cash in a hurry.

“However, they are often used by consumers in vulnerable situations and therefore we are concerned about the risk of consumers being misled and losing out on large sums of money.”

Activity by these firms has increased in recent years, against a backdrop of falling property sales and a growing numbers of people struggling to repay their mortgages – by the end of 2012, more than 150,000 households had fallen behind on mortgage repayments.

In their website marketing some companies appear to be targeting people in danger of repossession, offering a quick sale before the lender can act. Many seem to be focussing on areas where the housing market is very slow or repossession rates are high.

Consumers who have used these schemes can contact the OFT at quickhousesales@oft.gsi.gov.uk by 16 May 2013.

Warning over ‘quick house sales’

Category : Business

Consumers who want to sell their houses via so-called “quick sale” companies are in danger of being misled, according to the Office of Fair Trading.

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Gale Force Petroleum Inc. (GFPMF: OTCQX International) | GALE FORCE CONCLUDES OKLAHOMA PROPERTY SALE, PROVIDES STRATEGY UPDATE

Category : World News

Gale Force Petroleum Inc. (TSXV: GFP) (OTCQX: GFPMF) (the “Company” or “Gale Force”) today announced that it has concluded the sale of its Oklahoma Properties for $650,000, as part of a total $6.5 million property sales transaction, previously announced on March 15, 2013.

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New York court casts doubt on resale of digital music in ReDigi case

Category : Business

Judge says ‘second-hand’ service infringed on Capitol Records’ right to reproduction but experts suggest issue is not resolved

The legality of selling digital music in the same way as an old book or CD has been called into question, after a New York court ruled that the act is in violation of the copyright act. A New York federal district court judge, Richard Sullivan, ruled that the digital music reselling company ReDigi had infringed on Capitol Records’ rights to reproduction.

“Right now, there is no future for reselling digital music, but I don’t think this is the last word,” said Christopher Jon Sprigman, a law professor who is a co-author of the Knockoff Economy.

Capitol Records filed a complaint against ReDigi in January 2012, instigating a challenge to protections of the first sale doctrine – which gives owners of copies of products the ability to lawfully sell or lend a product, thereby allowing used bookstores, libraries and video rental stores to exist.

ReDigi, which launched in October 2011, allows people to sell digital music files at a lower price than that for which they were purchased. To resell digital music, users download software that determines if their music is eligible to sell. People can only resell music purchased on ReDigi and iTunes, and cannot sell music ripped from CDs or downloaded from file-sharing sites. The software continues to run scans on the user’s computer, to make sure users do not keep digital music files they have sold; people caught violating this rule have their accounts suspended.

The court determined that ReDigi is not protected by first sale because to resell music on ReDigi, the file must be transferred to the company’s servers in Arizona – which requires a technical, unauthorized recreation of the file. Sprigman said: “Yes, it’s making a copy, but only in the driest, most formal sense of making a copy.”

Sprigman said ReDigi’s process was “fairly reliable” and offered a way to transact digital goods without resulting in the proliferation of copies of a product. “From an economic basis that’s no different from taking the book that’s sitting on your bookshelf and putting it in a used bookstore,” he said.

If the digital reselling of music becomes a successful industry, the recording industry will likely see an increase in competition – just as the book industry has seen with an increase in second-hand bookstores. “Capitol Records doesn’t want the price of digital music to be disciplined,” Sprigman said. “In other words, it doesn’t want competition.”

Amazon, which includes the sale of used books as part of its business, recently patented an electronic marketplace that would permit the reselling of digital goods. The move sparked uproar from those who fear it will steer money away from the book and music industry.

Judge Sullivan said in his summary that his decision would not exclude all digital works from resale and that people could still sell a product that contains a musical recording, “be it a computer hard disk, iPod, or other memory device onto which the file was originally downloaded.” While he admitted that this presented obstacles to resale, he said it was up to Congress, not his court, to determine whether this was an outmoded way of thinking.

“The first sale defense does not cover this any more than it covered the sale of cassette recordings of vinyl records in a bygone era,” he wrote.

This case is the second of two closely watched first sale cases this year. In mid-March, the Supreme Court ruled that the first sale doctrine protected someone who made a business by selling textbooks he had purchased overseas.