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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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VIDEO: YouTubers welcome charging plan

Category : World News

Two of the UK’s most popular YouTube stars talk about new paid subscriptions coming to the site.

Original post: VIDEO: YouTubers welcome charging plan

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REPEAT-MEDIA ADVISORY/PHOTO OPPORTUNITY: The More We Walk, the More They Can Talk in Ontario

Category : World News

- BMO employees in Ontario will be walking with community members in support of Kids Help Phone in the Walk so Kids Can Talk presented by BMO on Sunday, May 5

- Thousands of BMO employees participating in more than 30 community and virtual walks across Canada

Read this article: REPEAT-MEDIA ADVISORY/PHOTO OPPORTUNITY: The More We Walk, the More They Can Talk in Ontario

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Jim Cheshire From Que Publishing and Ramsom Koay From Thermaltake to Be Featured on Let’s Talk Computers (R)

Category : Stocks, World News

NASHVILLE, TN–(Marketwired – May 3, 2013) – Guests from Que Publishing and Thermaltake will appear on radio talk show Let’s Talk Computers. Que Publishing, world’s largest education publisher, is a Pearson (NYSE: PSO) company. Thermaltake is a major brand for people who build their own computers — long known for computer cases, power supplies, CPU coolers and accessories — and they’ve recently expanded their line to include extra-high performance mice, keyboards and headsets.

Original post: Jim Cheshire From Que Publishing and Ramsom Koay From Thermaltake to Be Featured on Let’s Talk Computers (R)

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REMINDER: MEDIA ALERT: Forte Design Systems to Co-Sponsor the India SystemC User’s Group (ISCUG) Conference, Will Demonstrate High-Level Synthesis Offering

Category : Stocks, World News

Vice President of Technical Marketing Mike Meredith to Present Tutorial, SystemC Talk

See the article here: REMINDER: MEDIA ALERT: Forte Design Systems to Co-Sponsor the India SystemC User’s Group (ISCUG) Conference, Will Demonstrate High-Level Synthesis Offering

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Investors love their BlackBerry (stock)

Category : Business

Shares of BlackBerry rallied nearly 11% ahead of the Z10′s U.S. debut, and as takeover talk swirled.

See the original post here: Investors love their BlackBerry (stock)

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Big 9lb breakfast boosts business

Category : World News

The “Kidz Breakfast”, described as being the weight of a small child, remains the talk of a Norfolk seaside town.

Continued here: Big 9lb breakfast boosts business

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Silver Lake’s Hutchins keeps mouth shut

Category : Stocks

No talk of Dell, or anything else.

More: Silver Lake’s Hutchins keeps mouth shut

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Japan spurs talk of currency war

Category : Business, Stocks

Japan has come under fire for monetary policies that critics say will devalue the yen, but analysts say talk of a full-blown currency war is premature.

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Davos 2013: who will be there

Category : Business

David Cameron, Angela Merkel, Christine Lagarde and Charlize Theron among those set to talk at World Economic Forum

The World Economic Forum’s annual meeting begins in Davos on Wednesday with 2,600 politicians, bankers, tycoons and celebrities competing to get their latest sound bites heard.

The prime ministers of Italy and Russia, Mario Monti and Dmitry Medvedev, will have to follow the glamour of Hollywood’s Charlize Theron as the star turns on day one, with the politicians respectively talking about “leading against the odds” and the Russian economy. The boss of the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde, also gets a run-out.

Thursday will see the obligatory appearance of Henry Kissinger, the former US secretary of state, while the “special address” from German chancellor Angel Merkel will be followed by “an insight, an idea with George Osborne”. The evening’s entertainment will be kicked off by David Cameron, discussing global development with billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates and Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan.

The inventor of the world wide web, Tim Berners-Lee, will hold forth on what is wrong with social networking on Friday, while delegates who had been looking forward to a talk on “enterprise resilience” by Tom Albanese, who was ousted as boss of mining group Rio Tinto last week, will be disappointed that the session has mysteriously vanished from the Davos website.

Other attendees include Marks & Spencer’s embattled chief executive Marc Bolland, incoming Bank of England governor Mark Carney, a professor from Columbia University who describes himself in the list of attendees as a trombonist, plus one delegate called the Duke of York, who does not list his job or country.

World Trade Organisation’s new boss will face an in-tray filled with problems

Category : Business

This month, the Geneva-based trade body will start the hunt for a new director general, but is the decline of globalisation making it irrelevant?

At an elegant 1920s building set in a lush park on the shore of Lake Geneva this month, nine senior global politicians – six men and three women – will be attending an extraordinary job interview. The World Trade Organisation, once the hated target of anarchists and anti-globalisation protesters furious about unfair rules and backroom deals that locked poor countries out of the world’s markets, is seeking a new director general.

Yet few angry campaigners are expected to throng the centre of Geneva on 29-31 January, as the candidates file into the WTO’s headquarters to set out their vision for the future of the global marketplace. More than five years into the financial and economic crisis, the once-hot topic of “globalisation” is no longer where the action is.

“The WTO has lost an incredible amount of sex appeal,” says Ricardo Meléndez-Ortiz, chief executive of the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development, a Geneva-based thinktank.

In 1999, when a WTO meeting in Seattle was brought to a halt by street riots, it was the focus for protesters’ rising sense of injustice about the impact of globalisation on the world’s poor. Yet 14 years later, many of the most fraught issues rocking the world economy – on tax, on immigration, on exchange rates – are being fought out far from Geneva. And there are signs that aspects of the “globalisation” that was the WTO’s raison d’etre are being quietly unpicked.

The WTO, which polices international trade law as well as being a forum for negotiations, is having to arbitrate a growing number of international disputes, as the temporary truce called for by the G20 countries in the depths of the financial crisis gives way to a more fractious climate.

China and the US, for example, are battling each other over allegations that China unfairly subsidises its solar power industry. At the same time, multinational firms are beginning to reverse the relentless process of outsourcing, which has seen supply chains stretch out across the globe.

Meanwhile, the increasingly powerful emerging economies, burned by the experience of the financial crisis, are asserting their right to protect themselves against the surges of “hot money” that leave their economies vulnerable. Brazil, for example, has used taxes on foreign exchange – anathema in the days of the so-called Washington consensus – to try and stem the appreciation of its currency, the real.

“The days of expecting a lot out of outsourcing are gone,” says Simon Evenett, professor of trade and development at St

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