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Chase Bank Limits Cash Withdrawals, Bans International... Before you read this report, remember to sign up to http://pennystockpaycheck.com for 100% free stock alerts Chase Bank has moved to limit cash withdrawals while banning business customers from sending...

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Richemont chairman Johann Rupert to take 'grey gap... Billionaire 62-year-old to take 12 months off from Cartier and Montblanc luxury goods groupRichemont's chairman and founder Johann Rupert is to take a year off from September, leaving management of the...

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Cambodia: aftermath of fatal shoe factory collapse... Workers clear rubble following the collapse of a shoe factory in Kampong Speu, Cambodia, on Thursday

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Spate of recent shock departures by 50-something CEOs While the rising financial rewards of running a modern multinational have been well publicised, executive recruiters say the pressures of the job have also been ratcheted upOn approaching his 60th birthday...

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UK Uncut loses legal challenge over Goldman Sachs tax... While judge agreed the deal was 'not a glorious episode in the history of the Revenue', he ruled it was not unlawfulCampaign group UK Uncut Legal Action has lost its high court challenge over the legality...

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GEMA and BlackBerry Join Forces to Help Companies Transition to BlackBerry Enterprise Server 10 and BlackBerry 10 Devices

Category : Stocks, World News

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND and WATERLOO, ON–(Marketwired – May 8, 2013) – The Global Enterprise Mobility Alliance (GEMA) and BlackBerry® (NASDAQ: BBRY) (TSX: BB) today announced the signing of a BlackBerry® 10 Readiness Services global agreement to make the transition to BlackBerry Enterprise® Service 10 and migration to BlackBerry® 10 simple and seamless for enterprise customers worldwide.

View post: GEMA and BlackBerry Join Forces to Help Companies Transition to BlackBerry Enterprise Server 10 and BlackBerry 10 Devices

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Would we have had social enterprise without Margaret Thatcher?

Category : Business

Thatcherism taught us that a mixed market in the public sector is the future, and that a ‘state or market’ debate is outdated

There probably aren’t many Margaret Thatcher fans among social entrepreneurs, with most attributing the growth of market economics in social arenas to the measures introduced by Tony Blair. But would we have had the Right to Request without de-nationalisation or the Right to Buy?

As Ed Miliband said during parliament’s tribute sitting, Thatcher was right to recognise that our economy needed to change. In 1982, she said: “How absurd it will seem in a few years’ time that the state ran Pickfords removals and the Gleneagles Hotel.”

Thatcher introduced the idea that government should stop being the default employer and that the public sector needed mixed models of delivery – thinking that has been shared by successive governments ever since.

Looking at public sector reform through the point of view of the Transition Institute, set up to promote increased social value in public service created through non-public sector providers, we can see two major spikes in change; the first when Thatcher allowed the private sector to enter the domain of public services such as in municipal maintenance and waste collection; and the second when Blair introduced the concept of social enterprise into education, health and the then Department of Trade and Industry.

At my organisation, the Transition Institution, we know that the market economy drives down costs but can also fail if equal priority is not given to the needs of service users and the wider community, termed social value. Our work shows what can be achieved when the priority of cost effective services are shared with the needs of those that rely on services. We promote the work of co-operative schools, staff-led community interest youth services, and mutual delivery of community care.

The Transition Institution calls for plurality, a drive for an increase in social and economic value, demonstrating the coexistence of free market forces and social responsibility. The introduction of the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012 and the support of the cabinet office, led by Francis Maude, for the promotion of mutuals within the public sector have encouraged those seeking change in this field, but progress is slow.

Thatcher was perhaps the great advocate of the free market, even though employment in the public sector was 3% higher when she left office than it is now. She undoubtedly questioned the monopoly of the state and did not limit her introduction of market forces to the nationalisation of British Airways, British Gas and British Telecom, but went on to assert that the state can not commission, deliver and appraise every service without the emergence of a conflict of interest that does not serve the wider public, an idea continued under Blair.

In 2011, David Cameron said: “The Blair government took some good steps, like foundation hospitals and academy schools, but they were too tentative … The public already benefits from services delivered by private and third sector providers, from running walk-in clinics to providing school caretakers, and the government is right to recognise that there is scope to do more.”

Yet even with that commitment and other stated aims to grow mutualism, social value and community engagement, we have yet to see a third spike. Many prospective and new public sector spin-outs continue to be confronted by sceptical parent authorities and voracious private sector competitors with the advantage that they can get in quick. As in Thatcher’s era, it is money that counts: then inflation hit 21% and drove the government to think the unthinkable. Today, it’s the deficit and, with banks limiting borrowing, those with access to capital are moving faster. I do not have the results of the 2013 national Transition Institute survey yet, but I am willing to guess that access to capital is a big issue for today’s independent public service providers.

Margaret Thatcher introduced an idea that continues to grow, that of a mixed market in the public sector. Her scepticism about the public sector led to a deep-seated faith, shared by some in government today, that only unfettered competition can give us quality and affordability. In contrast, some on the left maintain that only the state can care for its citizens.

This is 2013 not 1983 and if the banking crisis and subsequent recession have taught us anything, it is that it may be hard to describe and tricky to measure but what the public sector needs is a mixed approach – only a combination of competition tempered by social value can create affordable and sustainable world-class public services.

Allison Ogden-Newton is chair of the Transition Institute.

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EA CEO steps down, stock tanks

Category : Business, Stocks

Electronic Arts has had a tough transition from the console world to mobile, online gaming. Shares plunged on a weak outlook after the company’s CEO said he would be leaving.

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Arian Silver Appoints New Chief Financial Officer

Category : Stocks

LONDON, ENGLAND–(Marketwire – Jan. 7, 2013) - Arian Silver Corporation (“Arian” or the “Company”) (TSX VENTURE:AGQ)(AIM:AGQ)(FRANKFURT:I3A), a silver exploration, development and production company with a focus on projects in the silver belt of Mexico, announces today the appointment of Mr John Mayfield as Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”) with effect from 7 January 2013. Outgoing CFO, Sam Clarke, who is leaving the Company to relocate overseas, will be assisting the transition phase to ensure continuity.

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China’s new party chief Xi gets strong mandate for action – Reuters

Category : Stocks


IBNLive
China's new party chief Xi gets strong mandate for action
Reuters
1 of 10. Newly-elected General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Xi Jinping (L) speaks as he meets with the press with other new Politburo Standing Committee members (from 2nd L to R) Zhang Gaoli, Liu Yunshan
China unveils new leadersLos Angeles Times
China's Transition—One out of Three Ain't GoodWall Street Journal
The BBC's Martin Patience says the new leaders face immense challengesBBC News
Telegraph.co.uk

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Time Out – the listings magazine with no listings

Category : Business

The newly free publication puts recommendations in print but leaves the detail online. Does that solve the digital dilemma?

There are two problems about the new Time Out as, henceforth, it is given away on the streets of London. One is simply the giving-away bit. Here are 300,000 copies of an expensive old favourite turned free. They sit alongside 431,000 free copies of Stylist magazine, 529,000 copies of Shortlist and 300,000 of Sport. That’s 1.56m of something or other each week that costs you nothing. Add them to 780,000 copies of Metro every weekday, plus 130,000 copies of burgeoning City AM. You’re never alone – on a bus, tube or train – without anything to read. And you’re never required to stump up a penny.

We talk sonorously about the “transition” from print to digital and the huge financial difficulties that causes. But we seldom pause to reflect that London alone, never mind most of Britain, is awash with millions of sheets of printed paper that reflect no sort of transition at all – except from some price to sweet nothing. The press, we are told, is an “industry” under attack. But never forget some of the most wincing assaults come from within.

And the other problem? That’s a little more complicated. For this, in its free version, is a listings magazine without listings – merely 80 pages of recommendations of shows, movies, exhibitions, places to eat, things to do. It’s lively enough. It’s a pleasant browse. But if you want actually to follow up on most of the choices, to know about times and prices and locations, then you need to head over to the Time Out website. That’s where the essential detail lies. The magazine itself isn’t useful, except as a prompter online, your starter for 10 minutes rummaging through an iPad.

It’s a compromise that reveals a still bigger difficulty. Must punters planning their evening’s entertainment be obliged to mix, match and forage for the information they need? Some guides – such as the Guardian’s still-successful pocket-book version – put digital second (or even third, as they still instruct you to ring a cinema for missing programmes and show timings). Some compendious TV listings magazines wrestle constantly with the excruciating digital dilemma of what to post free, for instant access, knowing that too much free replication of the print product could sink them fast. One half of the story in print, the other half online? That’s the Time Out decision, and probably a key one as the whole listings world wonders which way to turn next.

It may fail on several obvious counts. One is that the Time Out listings service online isn’t quite up to snuff. (Get a Flixster app and judge for yourself). Another, rather more fundamentally, is that the right sort of print guide stuffed in your travelling bag is an easier search-and-ponder tool than a smartphone when you haven’t already sussed where to go and what to see. A third is the lack of any meaningful TV coverage in free Time Out. That’s another extraneous loop you have to follow in the search for information you need. (And remember that Time Out’s existing readers are older rather than younger to begin with.)

None of this necessarily entails claps of doom, though. It will be up to advertisers to decide what’s worth paying for, and that will depend on the tally of bums on seats. It’s that vexing “transition” debate again. Is free, in print and online, all you need? Or does any positive resolution of the problem of how to spend your evening off inevitably involve pages turning as well as fingers clicking? One, or another, or both?

Sorry isn’t always the hardest word

One in-house word among journalists for a printed apology after some blunder or other reflects the pain and shame of getting things wrong. It’s “grovel” – as in “Is this another page two grovel?” But what more is there to say about the BBC’s apology to the Queen for quoting her modest distaste for Abu Hamza? It was a grovel supreme, a grovel incarnate, the ultimate groveller’s grovel. In short, chaps: a bit on the oleaginous side.

Digital-only Financial Times would still be a difficult trick to perform

Category : Business

As digital FT subscriptions outstrip its newspaper circulation, the printed version seems doomed, but the numbers don’t add up

There’s a predictable buzz of futurology as the FT announces that its digital subscription circulation (301,471 and rising) has passed its print sales (297,227 and falling). How long will it be before pink paper and pounding presses are mere memories? Now, with subscriptions swelling, the FT looks far better placed for such online transition, a digital trailblazer by choice rather than force of circumstance.

Yet hang around for a few more earthbound moments. Nobody, to be honest, can be quite sure yet what such progress means in hard cash terms: the Columbia Journalism Review punches whatever numbers it can find and pronounces FT accounting somewhat “opaque”. It’s fashionable enough for struggling publications to talk of going online-only. Newsweek hinted at just that transition the other day. But digital existence can also be low profile, going on totally obscure. As predicted, Rupert Murdoch’s tablet newspaper The Daily is finding cyberspace a cruel pool for making a splash: no news-stand visibility, no TV or radio summaries, no copies passed from hand to hand. A third of The Daily’s staff were laid off last week.

It’s no accident that big digital advertising launches still happen on posters, TV or via print. And FT editions on newsprint or online are complementary, one defined by familiarity with the other so that, as you sit at your screen in Singapore or Tokyo, the FT you scan there is given a special value by the personality and record of the paper version you can also buy. John Ridding, the FT’s buoyant chief executive, may see a long-term strategy working, but he bridles at the thought of the paper being put to death. On the contrary, digital success had given it “a new lease of life” he told the Guardian last week.

Remember, too, that the FT’s closest competitor, the Wall Street Journal – is big in print and big behind a paywall: 2.1m copies purchased, one way or another, every weekday. Of course the Journal is benefiting from rolling its print and digital reach together, claiming convincingly that it is America’s top-selling newspaper: but there’s no sign of Mr M falling out of love with presses or satellite printing there. Would a digital-only FT be able to compete with an all-singing, all-dancing Journal? Could it keep a separate identity in a new world where Bloomberg and Thomson Reuters are the biggest beasts? And how will it cope with a declining but still crucial print sale as real transition starts to bite? It’s easy to talk about moving from one world to another. But look – more puce than pink – at the logistics of the leap.

UN Vote on Syria Delayed Until Thursday – ABC News

Category : Stocks


ABC News
UN Vote on Syria Delayed Until Thursday
ABC News
The UN Security Council delayed a vote on a new Syria resolution until Thursday in a last-minute effort to get key Western nations and Russia to agree on measures to end the dramatically escalating violence. International envoy Kofi Annan contacted
Obama, Putin discuss situation in Syria, need for political transitionWashington Post
Obama calls Putin as Syria spins 'out of control'USA TODAY

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Amid Tensions, Clinton Meets Morsi – Wall Street Journal

Category : Stocks


Wall Street Journal
Amid Tensions, Clinton Meets Morsi
Wall Street Journal
By MATT BRADLEY CAIRO—After her first meeting with Egypt's new president, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waded cautiously into a divisive domestic debate over the role of that country's military, offering US support for the armed forces' “return
As Clinton and Morsi Meet in Egypt, US Voice Is MutedNew York Times
Clinton Arrives in Egypt to Push Transition to DemocracyBusinessweek
Clinton in Cairo to Discuss Egypt's Political TransitionVoice of America
ABC News
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Amid Tensions, Clinton Meets Morsi – Wall Street Journal

Category : Stocks


Wall Street Journal
Amid Tensions, Clinton Meets Morsi
Wall Street Journal
By MATT BRADLEY CAIRO—After her first meeting with Egypt's new president, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waded cautiously into a divisive domestic debate over the role of that country's military, offering US support for the armed forces' “return
As Clinton and Morsi Meet in Egypt, US Voice Is MutedNew York Times
Clinton Arrives in Egypt to Push Transition to DemocracyBusinessweek
Clinton Reaffirms Support for Egyptian TransitionVoice of America
ABC News
all 765 news articles